Can Anyone Help with a Mexican Song that Sounds Like, “Que lulu”?

Boyd wrote:

Hi :

My mother was Mexican. when i was a baby small child 60 years ago, she would sing this song.

I only remeber the “que lulu que lulu” , & another phrase which I butcher – it sounded to me like “some come alone”.

So it goes – ” que lulu que lulu , some come alone ” …. i’ve tried the internet to look for it , but can’t find it.

Ever heard of it ?

Thank you –

Boyd W. Wicks , Sr

If anyone can help with this song, please let us know in the comments below.

Thanks!

Mama Lisa

This article was posted on Tuesday, April 20th, 2010 at 6:01 pm and is filed under Children's Songs, Countries & Cultures, English, Languages, Mama Lisa, Mexican Children's Songs, Mexico, Questions, Readers Questions, Spanish. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

63 Responses to “Can Anyone Help with a Mexican Song that Sounds Like, “Que lulu”?”

  1. Lisa Yannucci Says:

    Shintaro Tominaga commented on your note “Can Anyone Help with a Mexican Song that Sounds Like, “Que lulu”?”:

    “I don’t know if I am right, but please try

    http://www.facebook.com/l/3398d;www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADxDpPOIznE

    The title is Cu cu ru cu cu Paloma by Harry Belafonte.”

  2. Elaine Says:

    Hi, I teach Kindermusik, and I sing a Mexican folk lullaby like that, but the only words are “Rurru que rurru que rurru rurru” (Repeat)

  3. Hildy Says:

    How about “A la ru ru Nino”?

  4. Lisa Says:

    Is this the one you mean…

    A la ru ru, nene,
    a la ru ru ya,
    duérmete mi nene,
    duérmase ya.

    Duérmase mi negro,
    cara de pambazo,
    que si no se duerme
    le doy un trancazo…
    Mi negrito lindo,
    ya se está durmiendo,
    pon cara de palo,
    que yo te estoy viendo…

    A la ru ru, nene,
    a la ru ru ró,
    este negro lindo
    ya se me durmió.

    Loose translation:

    Hush-a-bye baby,
    Hush-a-bye already,
    Go to sleep my baby,
    Sleep right now.

    Go to sleep my black one,
    Sandwich face,
    If you do not sleep
    I’ll give it a whack …
    My lovely black one,
    Is already sleeping
    Put on a straight face,
    I’m watching you …

    Hush-a-bye baby,
    Hush-a-bye-o
    This cute black one
    Already put me asleep.

  5. Cecilia Says:

    I am trying to find the same one, I remember it like:
    ru ru que ru ru que san camaleon, a la ru ru ….

  6. Katelyn Says:

    Does it go like this?

    Lulo, que, lulo
    que zanca mayor.

    Abajo del suelo,
    se vive un raton.

    Matalo, matalo,
    por ladron.

    Arriba en el cielo,
    se vive un coyote.

    Con ojos de plata,
    y los pies de azogue….

  7. Jessez Says:

    De: CANCIONES DE MI PADRE (1946)
    (Luisa Ronstadt Levin “Luisa Espinel”)

    Canto de Cuna

    Y más arribita está un agujero
    por donde se asoman narices de cuero.

    Más abajito está un boquerón
    por donde se asoma el mero pelón.

    ¿Dónde vas niñita tan de mañanita?
    a traer florecitas para mi hermanita.

    Señora Santa Ana toca la jarana.
    señor San Joaquín toca el violín.

    ¿Dónde vas niñita tan de madrugada?
    a traer lechugas para la ensalada.

    Señora Santa Ana, ¿Por qué llora el niño?
    Por una manzana que se le ha perdido.

    Dígale Ud. al niño que yo daré dos,
    Una para él y otra para vos.

    Este niño quiere que le cante yo.
    Que lo haga su madre, que Dios se lo dio.

    Duérmete niñito, que tengo que hacer,
    Lavar tus panales, sentarme a coser.

    Una camisita que te has de poner,
    El día de tu santo al amanecer.

    Duérmete niñito, duérmete y descansa,
    Porque en el cielo está toda tu esperanza.

    Ángeles del cielo vénganse volando,
    A llevarse al niño que aquí está llorando.

    Arriba del Cielo está una ventana
    por donde se asoma Señora Santana.

    Lu lu que lu lu que San Camaleón
    debajo de un hueco salió un ratón,
    mátalo, mátalo por ladrón.

    Arriba del Cielo torearon un toro
    con llaves de plata y pezuñas de oro

    Duérmete chiquito ya viene el coyote
    a matarlo viene a puros garrotes.

  8. Cokeysaid Says:

    Hi, the lyrics from Katelyn are correct, I sing it to my kids :)) Here is a video from youtube with it being sung: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3Hv2FLF1QE

    Lulo Que Lulo

    Lulo, que, lulo
    que zanca mayor.

    Abajo del suelo,
    se vive un raton.

    Matalo, matalo,
    por ladron.

    Arriba en el cielo,
    se vive un coyote.

    Con ojos de plata,
    y los pies de azogue….

  9. Conchita Says:

    Que rurru que rurru que tan tan tan
    Que leech que atole que para San Juan
    La virgen lloraba, san Jose tendía
    Y el niño lloraba de hambre que tenia

    Que rurru….

  10. Lina Says:

    ok I really know this song because I`m mexican, and my mom used to sing it to me and i use to sing it to my kids..

    Lulu que lulu que san camaleon
    debajo debajo sale un raton
    matalo matalo de un guanton

  11. Mary Lou Brown Says:

    I remember my mother back in the 1930s would sing some verses of Senora Santana with a chorus between verses that went like this:
    Que rura, que rura, que tan, tan, tan

  12. Mary Lou Brown Says:

    I remember my mother back in the 1930s would sing some verses of Senora Santana with a chorus between verses that went like this:
    Que rura, que rura, que tan, tan, tan

    PS I’m writing my childhood memories for my 8 children, 13 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. That is the reason I’ve been searching for childhood games we used to play like Listones,
    Cebollitas, Pobrecita Huerfanita, Los Encantados, etc.

  13. Lisa Says:

    Hi Mary Lou – Thanks for writing!

    Can you explain how to play any of those games? We’d like to learn!

    Cheers! Mama Lisa

  14. Diana Lara Says:

    The version I remember is similar to Lina’s:
    Lulu que lulu que san camaleon
    Debajo de un hueco salio un raton
    Matenlo mantenlo de un jalon
    Mimi lulu baby, mimi lulu ya
    mimi lulu baby, mimi lulu ya

    Anyone else?

  15. mony Says:

    lu lu san camaleon muchachas bonitas en cada rincon tu mama y tu papa fueron para leon a ver las maromas de un chango pelon
    señora santana señor san joaquin bendice ami niño que va a dormir arriba del cielo hay una ventana por donde se asoma señora santana y mas abajito hay un portillito por donde se asoma mi niño chiquito

  16. LUCY Says:

    MOM SING THAT SONG AND TO HER G-KIDS AND TO HER GREAT-GRAND KIDS, CONTACT ME AND I WILL HAVE MY MOM OBTAIN THE WORDS FOR YOU, SHE STILL SING THE SONG.

  17. Carla Says:

    Lu lu que lu lu que san camaleon arriba del hueco salio un raton matenlo marenlo de un guanton!

  18. carissa Says:

    wow! amazing to see so many versions of a folksong like this. i feel like the version my mother used to sing to me was a combination of many of the ones i see here — no two are exactly alike!

  19. Arlette Says:

    This song has been around for many generations and wanting to continue the tradition I asked my dad to write it down and send to me, the version that is most popular in the Southwest goes like this:

    Lulu que lulu
    que san cameleon
    debajo de un hueco sale un raton
    matenlo, matenlo
    por ladron
    este nino/a quiere que le cante yo
    que le cante su mami (mama)
    que ella lo/a pario

  20. Abigail Says:

    Hi everyone!!

    I am Mexican and my mother and grandmother used to sing this song to me, now my mom sings it to my daughter, I can tell you the version I know but not sure if this is the correct one, goes something like this:

    LULU QUE LULU QUE SANCAMALEON, DEBAJO DE UN HUECO SALE UN RATÓN
    MÁTENLO, MÁTENLO POR SER LADRÓN.

    then the tune changes:

    Este niño/a lindo/a que nació de noche
    Quiere que lo/la lleven a pasear en coche.

    Este niño/a lindo/a que nació de día
    Quiere que lo/la lleven a ver a su tia.

    I hope this is helpful and maybe we can complete the song or make our own version.

    Cheers everyone.

  21. Mary Ronstadt Says:

    If you wanna hear a new sound for lulo que lulo, look up Ronstadt Generations.

  22. Cristina Says:

    Lulu que lulu, que san camaleon
    Debajo de un hueco salio un raton
    matalo, matalo de un coscorron
    matalo, matalo de un coscorron

    Mariquita linda, ay viene Vicente,
    saquenle una silla
    para que se siente

  23. Marga Says:

    El niño lloraba, por una manzana, que se le cayó debajo de la cama, su mama la rata, su papa el ratón, tenían a _____(baby’s name)____ adentro de un cajón, que ruru, que ruru, que ran ran ran, atole con leche le daba San Juan.
    Hope this one is the one!!!!! regards.

  24. Marisela Chavez Says:

    To: Jessez
    Posted on: September 9th, 2010 at 5:49 pm

    Thank you so much for the words to this song! My mom has sung parts of it to all her generations and it continues forward. The funny part was that since her maiden name is Santana, we always thought that her mom wrote it…

    Thanks again!

  25. isis Says:

    Ru ru camaleon su mama la rata su papa el raton…

  26. Maria Says:

    My mom used to sing it to us and I sang it to my kids now I sing it to my g-baby
    The version I learned is
    Rru rru camaleon su papa y su mama se fueron a Leon a ver las maromas del puerco pelon rru rru carruru zancas de burro rru rru Camacho zancas de macho
    Atras de la puerta esta un agujero por donde se asoman narices de cuero

  27. Linda Says:

    My Aunt said her mom and my grandmother used to sing a similar song, but the title she remembers is the one listed below. I searched and found this information, but I couldn’t find the sound recording nor the rest of the words. I’ve submitted a request to the Library of Congress – American Folklife Center for information. Hopefully, I’ll get some feedback and post the words and recording.

    Ru, ru, ru, camaleon / Maria Gonzalez [sound recording]

    Title
    Ru, ru, ru, camaleon [sound recording]
    Recordist
    Lomax, John Avery, 1867-1948
    Singers
    Gonzalez, Maria
    Gonzalez, Blance
    Unidentified
    Place of Publication/Creation
    San Antonio, Texas
    Type of Material
    sound recording
    Date Recorded
    01-1936
    Language
    Spanish
    Form
    sound recording
    Performance note
    Sung by Maria y Blanca Gonzalez and children.
    Venue
    Lanier Senior High School
    Subject
    United States of America–Texas–San Antonio
    AFS Number
    AFS 00583 A04
    Repository
    American Folklife Center, Library of Congress

  28. Galy Says:

    My grandpa was from Michoacán in the south of México, and he usedto sing it like this:
    Lulu que lulu
    Que San Camaleón
    Debajo de un hueco
    Salió un ratón
    Mátalo, mátalo
    De un pisotón
    Señora Santa Ana
    Señor San Joaquín
    Por qué llora el niño
    Que se va a dormir?
    And you start all over again until either you or the baby fall asleep hahahaha.
    PS: I am also Mexican, from Sonora. And i think un pistón (step on it) sorta makes more sense than un coscorrón ( a knock on the head) :P

  29. Cesar Miramontes Says:

    For some years now I’ve been planning on searching for the “sleep song” (or whatever it is) that my grandmother used to sing to us, her grandchildren. She died 26 or 27 years ago, haven’t asked my mother, doubt she’ll recall everything but later I’ll see.
    Now for the first time I searched and just found this blog post. Looks like there are a lot of versions, it’s unlikely I’ll find the one my grandmother used to sing. I believe she lived in Zacatecas and Coahuila for a while, but most of her life she lived here in Guadalajara, Jalisco.

    The snippets I recall are:
    “Señora Santa Ana, ¿por qué llora el niño?
    Por una manzana que se le ha perdido.
    …. … .. dos,
    una para el niño y una para Dios.”

    “Ruu ruu cama de león, su mama la rata su papa el ratón”
    “Su mama y su papa se fueron a León,
    a ver las maromas de un gato tripón.”

    Don’t recall she ever mentioned the other phrases already posted. Hope more people start searching for it and share the snippets they know here.

  30. Monique Says:

    There are many versions of Señora Santa Ana. The missing lines must be something like “Véngase a mi casa, yo le daré dos” or “Yo te daré una, yo te daré dos” or “Vamos a mi quinta, yo te daré dos”, or “Vamos a la huerta y cortamos dos”…
    We have a version on Mama Lisa’s Cuba page, another on Mama Lisa’s Uruguay page.

  31. Glorian Says:

    Mi mamá cantaba esta canción de cuna y yo se la canto a mi nietecito.

    Arriba del cielo hay una ventana por donde se asoma Señora Santa Ana y más abajito hay un canapé en donde se acuesta Señor San José. Lu lu que lu lu que san camaleón debajo del hueco salió el ratón, mátenlo, mátenlo por ladrón. Este niño quiere que lo duerma yo, duérmalo su madre ya que lo parió, lu lu que lu lu que san camaleón, debajo del hueco salió el ratón, mátenlo, mátenlo por ladrón……

    Eso es lo que recuerdo.

    English Translation of this comment:

    My mother sang this lullaby and I sing it to my little grandson…

    Up in the sky there is a window where Mrs. Santa Ana looks out and just below there is a sofa bed where Saint Joseph lies. Lu lu and lu lu, saint chameleon the mouse went out from under the hole, kill him, kill him like a thief. This child wants me to put him to sleep, that his mother lulls him to sleep since she bore him, lu lu and lu lu saint chameleon the mouse came out from under the hole, kill him, kill him like a thief……

    That’s what I remember.

  32. Alex Says:

    I guess everyone has different versions of it, but my mom used to sing it with the Senora Santa Ana and it went a little like this:

    Senora Santa Ana
    porque llora el nino
    por una manzana
    que se le a perdido
    llevela a la huerta a cortarle dos
    una para el nino y otra para dios

    que lulu que lulu
    que San Camaleon
    debajo de un hueco salio un raton
    tirenlo tirenlo al callejon
    denselo denselo al viejo cabezon

    I guess my mom didn’t like killing the mouse and since her family is both from Sonora and Sinaloa the versions got mixed up.

  33. suly Says:

    My mom sang a song to me when I was little and i sing it to my little one bit but I still have to ask her some of the lyrics…
    A la ruru niña a la ruru ya
    Duermase mi niña duermase me ya

    Señora santana por que llora la niña
    Por una mansana que esta perdida

    No llore por una yo aqui tengo dos
    Una pa la ñina y otra para Dios

    Señora santana señor san juaquin
    Cantele a esta niña que se va dormir

    A la ruru niña a la ruru ya
    Ya sueña mi niña
    Ya durmiendo esta.

  34. Ana G raciela Says:

    Mi mamá nos cantaba así;
    Lulu que lu lu
    Que san camaleón
    Debajo de un hueco salió un ratón
    El ratón era amarillo…………….y no me puedo acordar que sigue!!!

  35. EVELEN B Says:

    MY GODFATHER USE TO SING THIS SONG TO ME BUT I THINK HE CHANGED IT UP A BIT:
    QUE LU LU QUE LULU QUE SAN CAMALEON DE BAJO DE UN HUECO QUE SALE UN RATON
    ESTA NINA QUIERE QUE LA DUERMA YO, DUERMALA SU MAMA QUE ELLA LA PARIO.

    LOL LOVED IT.

  36. Leslie Says:

    My Nana, from Cananea in Sonora, sang it as Lulu Lulu Lulu ta ta ya parrio la gata, quarto cochinitos y una garrapata. Lulu que lulu que sancamaleon, debajo de mesa, salio un raton, matalo, matalo, con su baston.

  37. La Marinita Says:

    My dad was from Sinaloa, my mom from Zacatecas. Both sang it to us as kids & to our kids. I vaguely recall it this way:
    Lu lu que lu lu
    Que salga un ladron
    Debajo un hueco
    Salio un raton
    A la lulu (insert name)
    A la lu lu ya
    Duermate (insert name) duermase ya
    Lu lu que lu lu
    Que salga un leon
    Debajo un puente salio un ladron
    Duermate (insert name), duermate ya
    Duermete mi niña/o
    O te comera

    There may have been more to it, or words were changed from generatio to generation, or even regionally. Hope it helps. I know everyones’ posts helped me greatly.

  38. Daisy Says:

    Que Ru Ru que Ru Ru que pan pan pan,
    Que leche, que altole para San Juan
    Esta nina linda, ya se va dormir,
    Tiéndale su cuna, en el toronjil
    Repeat the verse
    My grandmother used to sing this to me

  39. Sarah Says:

    My grandma is 100 years old and she has always sang that song to my kids. I googled it to see if lyrics were real and found this. I know most of the words but I’m so surprised to know she wasn’t making them up!!

  40. adriana Says:

    Mi bisabuela nos cantaba esa canción ahora se la canta a mis hijos. Ella canta asi…. arriba del cielo torearon a un toro con llaves de plata y cadenas de oro. Lulu que lulu que san camaleón de bajo del suelo salió un ratón mátenlo mátenlo por llorón tírenlo tírenlo para el callejón por llorón y cachetón.

    English Translation:

    My great-grandmother used to sing this song to us, now she sings it to my children. She sings it like this:

    “Arriba del cielo torearon a un toro con llaves de plata y cadenas de oro. Lulu que lulu que san camaleon de bajo del suelo salio un rato matenlo matenlo por lloron tirenlo tirenlo para el callejon por lloron y cacheton.”

    [Up in the heavens, they fought a bull with silver keys and gold chains. Lulu que lulu que san camaleón* from under the ground a mouse got out; kill it, kill it for being whiny, throw it, throw it in the alley for being whiny and barefaced.

    *Nonsense words though “san camaleón” might be literally translated as “saint chameleon”.]

  41. carissa Says:

    Since my comment several years ago, I’ve remembered the words with my mom’s help. Our version goes like this:

    Lulu que lulu
    que san camaleón,
    Debajo de un hueco
    Salió un raton
    Mátenlo, mátenlo
    De un sopetón
    Esta nina quiere
    Que le cante yo.
    Cántele su madre,
    Que ella la parió.

    I found a very similar version quoted in a book about Mexican folklore, here:
    https://books.google.com/books?id=1_1GfN28tQMC&pg=PA55&lpg=PA55&dq=lulu+que+lulu+que+san+camaleon&source=bl&ots=iRh45v24S3&sig=UmpM9_R9cSuWtVc2wiJh3jurhvk&hl=en&sa=X&ei=1HHRVMLtHsKvggTTmoLQAQ&ved=0CCkQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=lulu%20que%20lulu%20que%20san%20camaleon&f=false

    I think(?) it came down from my maternal grandmother (and maybe her mother?), whose family was from Sonora and who grew up in an Arizona border town. I sing it to my daughter now.

  42. Patricia Heredia Says:

    I remember it, with different lyrics my mom sang the señora santana part but she would sing vamos a la tienda comparemos dos u no para baby otra para Dios, a la roo roo baby ala roo roo baby.

  43. Rachel Lopez Key Says:

    I was just asking my 95 year old grandma about this song my grandpa, who I called dad would sing to me
    Que lu lu Que lu lu, que tan, tan, tan
    Que leche atole, le da a don Juan
    A la lu lu mija, duermase me babe
    porque’l viene el viejo y te va comer

    So this is how I remember it, about 50+years later, when I asked my grandma, she just laughed, so I took it was partly tradition and partly made up. My grandfather’s name was Juan, it it possible it was sung to him and he passed it on to us. It is a dear memory. My grandfather was born in Mexico and fought in WW11. We live in Acton, CA.

  44. Fred Espinoza Says:

    The first wrinkle on by brain went like this 80 years ago..I can still hear my mother trying to put me to sleep.

    “Ah la ru ru ru ru, patita de burro.” That’s all I remember.

  45. Monique Says:

    I found a couple of versions online, one goes:
    A la rurru rurru,
    patitas de burro,
    a la raca raca,
    patitas de vaca.

    And the other goes:
    Rurro, carrurro,
    patitas de burro,
    rey, carrey,
    patitas de buey.

  46. Gris Says:

    My moms sings it to my son, nephews and nieces. What I remember goes like this:

    Lulu que lulu que san camaleon
    Debajo del mueble sale el raton
    Metanlo metanlo al callejon que este niño lindo ya se va a dormir

  47. Uncle Noah Says:

    I have this memory in my head of my grandma singing
    Su mama la araña
    Su papa el ratón
    a rurru mi hijo
    y duerme se va

    it’s probably the same song and my youthful ears just heard the lyrics wrong

  48. Jose M. Martinez Says:

    Everyone’s responses seem to be close. My mother also sang a song to me as a child in Guaymas, Sonora, Mexico when I was a child less than two years old. It went like this, however:
    “Este nino quiere, que le cante yo, cantele su madre, que le cante yo, cantele, cantele corazon, lo quiero lo quiero con todo amor,….” etc. I look up the different variations on Youtube but none come close. The song sounded so loving and tender that I entitled my autobiography with it. I wish you all the luck in finding your dreams.

  49. Angelica Says:

    My mother used to sing a song like this to us when we were little, she was from zacatecas and she always told us that my great granpa would sing it to his children and grandchildren it went something like this:

    Rrurru cama de leon tu mama y tu papa se fueron de leon a ver la maromas del burro pelon, señor santa anna porque llora el niño? Por una manzana que se le perdio, iremos a la huerta y cortaremos dos una para el niño y otra para dios.

    There was more to the song but thats all i can remember.

  50. Monique Says:

    The line “a ver las maromas del burro pelón” can also be found as “… del puerco pelón”.
    There are many versions of Señora Santana (or “Santa Ana”). Mama Lisa’s World has a version on Mexico page, another on Chile page, another on Cuba page, another on Uruguay page.

  51. Erika Says:

    My grandmother, aunt and mom we born and raised in Managua Nicaragua. I remember they would sing 🎶 a similar song to my cousins and I. My aunt knew it best, but passed. My grandmother now has dementia and Alzheimer’s. My mom, the youngest, only recalls these verses. I now sing these to my kids. We call it ” The Ruu Ruu Song” they love it. Just wish I knew the entire song. I will adjust baby boy when singing to my son and baby girl for when I sing to my daughter. If anyone knows it, I’d appreciate it if you shared.

    A ruu ruu mi Nino, a ruu ruu mi amor
    Dormite pedazo de mi corazon,

    Maria lavava, San Jose tendia
    Y El Niño llorava,
    Del frio que tenia.

    A ruu ruu mi Nino, a ruu ruu mi amor
    Dormite pedazo de mi Corazon,

    Senora Donsella, de que llorar El Niño
    Por una manzana que se le perdido.

    A ruu ruu mi Nino, a ruu ruu mi amor
    Dormite pedazo de mi corazon,

  52. Monique Says:

    Erika, your song is made of pieces of different versions of 3 songs Aruru mi niño, María lavaba and Señora Santa Ana (or Señora Santana). So it isn’t one “entire song”.

  53. Yolanda Says:

    My father sang it this way. I think….
    He came to the U.S. from Ures, Sonora when he was 3. He must have learned from his mother.

    Lulu que lulu que San Camaleon.
    De un palo weco salio un raton.
    Matenlo Matenlo duen sol rincon.
    Mirenlo muchachos, porque lloyda el nino?
    Es una manzana, que se la perdido.

    Repeat over and over.

  54. Stephanie Says:

    So funny seems like our parents or grandparents made up the parts they couldn’t remember now I don’t feel guilty when I sing to my kids

  55. Mercedsgirl Says:

    Mother in law sings to my kids:
    Ana ru ru ru ru, patitas de burro
    Ani ru ru raca, patitas de vaca
    Duermace mi nino, que tengo que hacer…
    lavar y planchar y hacer de comer.

  56. YuriBall Says:

    I remember this…
    Ruru que ruru que sacamaleon debajo de un hueco sale un ratón
    Esta niña linda me quiere decir que apaguen las luces pa poder dormir… i can’t remember the rest!

  57. Mary Mirtala Says:

    My mother in law would sing this to her children and the to all my children when they were infants and I sing it to my grandbabies but it’s different than those listed. I only know 2 verses and wondered if anyone knew this.

    La Virgin lavaba, San Jose tendia, y el ninito bueno, solo se dormia.
    A la la la ru ru, porque llora el nino? Por una mansana que se le aperdido.

  58. Lisa Says:

    Hi Mary – It sounds like a combination of 3 songs:

    La Virgen gitana – lyrics here
    Señora Santa Ana – lyrics here

    And “Que lulu” that’s talked about in the comments above on this page.

    I hope this helps!

    -Lisa

  59. Lisa H Says:

    My mom used to sing it to my sibling and I. She would sing “Señora Santa Ana
    porque llora Lisa
    Por una manzaña
    Que se le ha perdido
    Iremos al huerto cortaremos dos
    Una para Lisa y otra para Dios.”
    She would take turns between mentioning our names. I will always be terrified of ‘narices de cuero’ !!!
    Another one that my mom used to tell us was “margarita de bayle”?
    You should check that one out!

  60. Xicho Says:

    I was just singing this song to my daughter and she asked me for details and I found your page. I know you posted almost 9 years ago but I’ll give you my 2 cents. Mi madrecita would sing us ” lu lu que lu lu que sancamaleon, maten lo maten lo salio un raton”

  61. Lisa Says:

    Thank you! We’re often still discussing songs years later. We always welcome feedback.

  62. Desiree Says:

    Thank you so much for this. I was hoping my Nana (grandma) would write these lyrics down to me before she was unable to, but here I am sitting with her racking my brain trying to sing this lullaby she would sing to me, to her. I’ve been able to piece it together thanks to everyone’s responses 💕

    Ruru, que ruru. Que tan tan tan
    Y leche, y atole, para San Juan.
    Esta niña linda, me quiere decir que,
    Apaguen las luces, pa poder dormir.

  63. Lisa Says:

    Here’s a translation of Desiree’s version:

    Lullaby, and lullaby, and tan, tan, tan
    And milk and atole* on St John’s Day.
    This fine baby girl wants to tell me
    To turn off the lights so she can sleep.

    *Atole is a traditional hot corn-flour-based beverage from Mexico and Central America. People drink it for Las Posadas.

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