"My father and mother were Irish, and I am Irish too" – A Song with Video

800px-Trifolium_repens_Leaf_April_2,_2010The Ninepenny Fidil (Fiddle) is a song about playing a fiddle and about meeting a leprechaun. 

The song was written by Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil and arranged by Herbert Hughes to old Irish melody.

Below you can listen to a video of the song, followed by the lyrics.

The Ninepenny Fidil

My father and mother were Irish,
And I am Irish too
I bought a wee fidil for ninepence,
And it is Irish too
I’m up in the morning early
To meet the dawn of day
And to the lint-white’s* piping,
The many’s the tune I play!

One pleasant eve in June time
I met a lochrie man,
His face and hands were weazen**,
His height was not a span.
He boor’d me for my fidil,
"You know" says he, "Like you,
My father and mother were Irish,
And I am Irish too!"

He took my wee red fidil,
And such a tune he turned,
The Glaise in it whisper’d,
The lionan in it m’urned’
Says he "My lad, you’re lucky,
I wish t’ I was like you,
You’re lucky in your birth star,
And in your fidil, too!"

He gave me back my fidil,
My fidil-stick also
And stepping like a may-boy,
He jump’d the Leargaidh Knowe
I never saw him after,
Nor met his gentle kind:
But, whiles, I think I hear him,
A-wheening in the wind!

My father and mother were Irish,
And I am Irish too,
I bought a wee fidil for ninepence
And it is Irish too.
I’m up in the morning early
To greet the dawn of day
And to the lintwhite’s piping,
The many’s the tune I play.

*A lint-white is a linnet (a small finch)
**Wizened

This song was sung by Maureen Hegarty in the video.

This article was posted on Saturday, March 16th, 2013 at 10:05 pm and is filed under Countries & Cultures, Folk Music, Folk Songs, Holiday Songs, Holidays Around the World, Ireland, Music, St. Patrick's Day, St. Patrick's Day Songs, USA, YouTube. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

5 Responses to “"My father and mother were Irish, and I am Irish too" – A Song with Video”

  1. Jessica Rich Says:

    I learned this song from my 3rd grade teacher Mrs. McCaulluph. Still brings back great memories.

  2. Daniel Ewen Says:

    This song is lovely. I know the first line to belong to a children’s game that is sung to the tune “For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow”. The game was played similar to tag and is documented as early as 1902 in the U.S. Because of the tune, the lyrics then are quite different throughout the song but it starts the same.

  3. Lisa Says:

    That’s interesting Daniel. Would you like to share that song/game with us? -Mama Lisa

  4. Richard Says:

    I looked on here to see if I could find the song I was taught over 60 years ago as a child:
    My Father and Mother are Irish
    They live on Irish stew
    They bought a tin kettle for nine pence
    And that was Irish too.

    I have some Irish ancestry so assume it may have come down the line, but now I wonder if it was a family joke based on the one you have here!

  5. Mont Howard Says:

    Dad used to sing the 2nd verse something like:

    We churned the butter in Dad’s old boot
    We churned the butter in Dad’s old boot.
    We churned the butter in Dad’s old boot.
    And that was Irish too.

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