Can Anyone Help with a German Song/Rhyme that Begins Like “Vender kinder klinderzine”?

Tami wrote:

Mama Lisa,

My name is Tami Best and I am looking for some help with a song. I am working on getting the original and English translation to a German children’s song/rhyme that has been passed down from generations. My dad is turing 60 and I am trying to suprise him with this for his birthday, as this was a song sung to him by his German immigrant grandparents and then carried on by his parents. They are all gone now and I am left with two versions, one from my dad and one from his sister. I am hoping that they will be a little recognizable as one song you already have. If you could please help me that would be wonderful! This has been a semi-frustrating experience.

Version one

Vinder kinder klienderzine
Uh riden see how stickeline
Uh vinder grocer vair
Dinder Rinden see how fair
Dender fair sed trip trip trop
Smitzer kinder rider up
Kaboosdolecktee (or Kaboosdoleckter)

Version two

Vender kinder klinderzine
A gridenzy how steckerline
Vender gratzer Vare
Den der ridenzy how fare
Den der fare sed triptriptrop
Smister Kinder Rider Op
Kaboospy Dolliker
Kaboop Dolliksey

Any direction or assistance would be greatly appreciated. Thank you very much Tami Best

If anyone can help Tami out with this song, please comment below or email me.

Thanks!

Lisa

This article was posted on Thursday, June 14th, 2007 at 5:21 pm and is filed under Children's Songs, Countries & Cultures, German, German Children's Songs, German Nursery Rhymes, Germany, Languages, Nursery Rhymes, Questions, Readers Questions. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

16 Responses to “Can Anyone Help with a German Song/Rhyme that Begins Like “Vender kinder klinderzine”?”

  1. Lisa Says:

    I received this email today that gives Tami’s line with the (likely) German text and an English translation:

    Hi Lisa,

    Just stumbled upon your site, which btw is very nice.

    Although I do not know the rhyme requested by Tami I’ll give it a go according to the phonetics.

    —–

    Vinder kinder klienderzine

    Wenn die Kinder kleiner sein,

    When the children are younger

    —–

    Uh riden see how stickeline

    Da reiten sie auf Steckelein,

    They are riding on sticks
    (Sticks referring to hobby horses – german ‘Steckenpferd’)

    ——

    Uh vinder grocer vair

    Und wenn die Kinder grösser werden

    And when the children grow up

    ——

    Dinder Rinden see how fair

    Dann reiten sie auf Pferden

    Then they are riding horses

    ——

    Dender fair sed trip trip trop

    Dann das Pferd geht tripp tripp trapp

    Then the horse goes trip trip trop

    ——

    Smitzer kinder rider up

    Schmeisst den Kinderreiter ab

    Throws the children-rider off

    —–

    Kaboosdolecktee (or Kaboosdoleckter)

    This just seems a nonsense-filler off some sort.

    No wait a minute, could mean something like:

    Kabusch – da liegt er …

    Kaboosh – there he lies …

    Hope this helps and all the best

    ***

    Then I received another email by the same person:

    Hi,

    it’s me again ;-)

    I’m pretty sure about the last line now that I’ve read the 2nd version of Tami.

    Kaboospy Dolliker

    Kabusch – da liegt er …

    Kaboosh – there he lies …

    Kaboop Dolliksey

    Kabusch – da liegt sie …

    Kaboosh – there she lies …

    Depending if you’re playing with a girl or a boy.

    Cheers

    Many thanks for taking the time to write!

    Lisa

  2. Tami Best Says:

    Thank you sooo much. This is very exciting to finally be able to complete this for my dad. I reallly appreciate your taking the time to translate this for me! Thanks for the help!! Tami

  3. Karen Says:

    My father also had a “poem” like this and it was bouncing kids on his knee – towards the end it was something
    like, Klop, Klop,Klop, klop, klop,klop, smeish die kleine rider opft
    (clop, clop, clop, throw the small rider off)
    bisen in die graben, then boomp=zacht
    (tickel the kid and then pretend to bounce the kid off
    the knee)
    der lieght die ziehn.
    (there he lies)
    Of course the child was never bounced to the floor, but it
    was a pretend game of riding a horse. I too have been
    looking for the real words to this as you can see – my
    German is only phonetic from what I herd.

  4. Carol Says:

    My grandmother who was born in 1867, used to bounce me on her knee and recite a poem somewhat like the following:

    Oop-de-oop-de perchon
    Perchon, perchon (blank, blank, blank)???????
    and ended with:
    schmak the baby in the dirt???

    Does anyone have the correct words to this old child’s game. The person would bounce the child on his/her knees and then pretend to drop the
    child on the ground.

  5. Simone Says:

    To Karen:
    Maybe it´s the german song “Hoppe hoppe Reiter”. It goes like this:
    Hoppe hoppe Reiter,
    wenn er fällt,
    dann schreit er.
    Fällt er in den Graben,
    fressen ihn die Raben.
    Fällt er in den Sumpf,
    dann macht der Reiter plumps!

    Hopp hopp rider,
    if he falls,
    he´s crying.
    He falls in the ditch
    the ravens eat him.
    He falls in the swamp
    then he makes thud!

    Sorry, not my best translation!

  6. Jana Says:

    Hoppe hoppe Reiter,
    (Hopp Hopp rider)
    (bouncing on knees)
    Wenn er fällt,
    (when he falls)
    (bouncing on knees)
    Dann schreit er,
    (then he cries)
    (bouncing on knees)
    Fällt er in den Graben,
    (when he falls in the ditch)
    Bouncing on knees)
    Fressen ihn die Raben,
    (the ravens eat him)
    (tickling child)
    Fällt er in den Sumpf,
    (when he falls in the swamp)
    (bouncing on knees)
    Macht der Reiter plumps!
    (the rider falls)
    (leaning child back or lowering knees)

  7. lesley Says:

    English version
    This is the way the ladies ride triptroptriptroptriptriptrop
    (child on knee being gently bouned)
    this is the way the gentlemen ride gallopgallop gallop
    ( child on knee bouncing more)
    this is the way the farmers ride-hobblede hoy hobblehoy and DOWN into the ditch
    (pretend child is thrown from knee and tickle her/him).
    alternative version..
    this is the way your mummy drives
    this is the way the bus driver drives..
    this is the way your DADDY drives..
    make up your own actions, lots of shouting out of pretend window for daddy…

  8. Elle Müller Says:

    Another lady (from Wisconsin) was looking for the same song – I’m sure of it.

    Unfortunately I have so many tabs open, and long ago closed it. However, I copied her questionable lyrics and the best answer which did not have a on-to-one correspondence.

    This may be the best answer anyone will ever get or give.

    As we shall see, her version has a first line no one else has quoted in this thread, and it refers to the sound of a horse’s hooves and the wheels of a cart against a cobblestone road.

    Although the Wisconsin lady’s version is incomplete, this combined with Lisa’s supplied best guess, and the other thread’s best source should be of great help.

    The Wisconsan lady asked about this version:
    >>Scheckle, scheckle, reiderlein,
    Ven die kinder kleinerschein
    Reiden zie auf steckelein,
    Ven zie greissa verden
    Reiden zie auferden
    Zen zie verten,
    Klip, Klop, Klip Klop
    Reiden zi (then something like a scary word or sounds)
    “Boom stehl leckta!” really loud!<>Schacker, schacker Reiterlein,
    Wenn die Kinder kleine sein,
    Reiten sie auf Stöckelein,
    Wenn sie größer werden,
    Reiten Sie auf Pferden,
    Wenn sie größer wachsen,
    Reiten sie nach Sachsen,
    Wo die schönen Mädchen
    Auf den Bäumen wachsen.
    Reiter, Reiter, übern Graben,
    Wenn er ´neinfällt, muß er´s haben.
    Fällt er in den grünen Klee,
    So schreit er: O weh, o weh!
    Fällt er in die Hecken,
    Fressen ihn die Schnecken.
    Fällt er auf die Steine,
    Tun ihm weh die Beine.
    Fällt er in den Graben,
    Fressen ihn die Raben.
    Fällt er in den Sumpf,
    Macht er plumps, plumps, plumps!<>Schacker, schacker Reiterlein<>Wenn die Kinder kleine sein<>shacker, schacker Reiterlein<<.

    http://www.volksliederarchiv.de/kinderreime-573.html

    Last but not least, this YouTube video I found seems to almost match exactly, but I was not familiar with it until I stumbled across it on a web search.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJwP4_oqAvo

    Have I been helpful and thorough enough to forgive my verbosity?
    http://www.mamalisa.com/blog/can-anyone-help-with-a-german-songrhyme-that-begins-vender-kinder-klinderzine/

  9. Elle Müller Says:

    I apologise! Apparently there was a problem with my previous post, and I unknowingly encoded HTML which renders my post non-intelligible.

    Here is the corrected version.
    -=-=-

    Another lady (from Wisconsin) was looking for the same song – I’m sure of it.

    Unfortunately I have so many tabs open, and long ago closed it. However, I copied her questionable lyrics and the best answer which did not have a on-to-one correspondence.

    This may be the best answer anyone will ever get or give.

    As we shall see, her version has a first line no one else has quoted in this thread, and it refers to the sound of a horse’s hooves and the wheels of a cart against a cobblestone road.

    Although the Wisconsin lady’s version is incomplete, this combined with Lisa’s supplied best guess, and the other thread’s best source should be of great help.

    The Wisconsan lady asked about this version:
    ‘Scheckle, scheckle, reiderlein,
    Ven die kinder kleinerschein
    Reiden zie auf steckelein,
    Ven zie greissa verden
    Reiden zie auferden
    Zen zie verten,
    Klip, Klop, Klip Klop
    Reiden zi (then something like a scary word or sounds)
    “Boom stehl leckta!” really loud!’

    The ‘boom stehl leckta’ is obviously corresponding to ‘(Ka)bumms! da liegt er/sie’.

    Lisa’s first response is exactly what I would say to the two versions were I asked about it. The aunt gave a version where the final line supports the song having been sung to a girl, and the father’s version, to a boy.

    The best answer from the other thread was this version (which is not a perfect match):
    ‘Schacker, schacker Reiterlein,
    Wenn die Kinder kleine sein,
    Reiten sie auf Stöckelein,
    Wenn sie größer werden,
    Reiten Sie auf Pferden,
    Wenn sie größer wachsen,
    Reiten sie nach Sachsen,
    Wo die schönen Mädchen
    Auf den Bäumen wachsen.
    Reiter, Reiter, übern Graben,
    Wenn er ´neinfällt, muß er´s haben.
    Fällt er in den grünen Klee,
    So schreit er: O weh, o weh!
    Fällt er in die Hecken,
    Fressen ihn die Schnecken.
    Fällt er auf die Steine,
    Tun ihm weh die Beine.
    Fällt er in den Graben,
    Fressen ihn die Raben.
    Fällt er in den Sumpf,
    Macht er plumps, plumps, plumps!’

    I have a similar version in my own memory that is halfway between the short version(s) in this thread, and the and longer possible-source version from the other thread.

    Explanation:
    This probably is the original (Saxonian) nursery rhyme of which you phonetically remember a portion (and from the looks of it, what you remember was “gesächselt”). The music to this version is probably the rhythm you sing your versions in!

    Title: Hopp hopp hopp Reiterlein

    Hop, hop, hop, li’l rider

    Activity: Kind hoppelt auf dem Schoß

    child hopping on the lap

    [Here’s where the actual rhyme starts:]

    Hopp hopp hopp, Reiterlein,

    Hop, hop, hop, li’l rider,

    wenn die Kinder kleine sein,

    when children are small

    reiten sie auf Stöckelein

    they ride on a stick (horse)

    wenn sie größer werden,

    when they grow larger

    reiten sie auf Pferden,

    they ride on (real) horses

    wenn sie dann noch wachsen,

    if they still grow, then

    reiten sie nach Sachsen.

    they (will) ride to Saxonia

    Geht das Pferdchen trab, trab, trab,

    (And) the little horse goes trot, trot, trot,

    wirft den kleinen Reiter ab,

    throws down the little rider

    Plumps liegt er im Graben.

    thud, he lays in a ditch.

    -=-=-

    Here’s a possible source for the music that nearly fits with any of the shorter versions, but it seems that something containing 7 syllables is missing between ‘Schacker, schacker Reiterlein’ and ‘Wenn die Kinder kleine sein’, or before ‘shacker, schacker Reiterlein’.

    http://www.volksliederarchiv.de/kinderreime-573.html

    Last but not least, this YouTube video I found seems to almost match exactly, but I was not familiar with it until I stumbled across it on a web search.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJwP4_oqAvo

    Have I been helpful and thorough enough to forgive my verbosity?
    http://www.mamalisa.com/blog/can-anyone-help-with-a-german-songrhyme-that-begins-vender-kinder-klinderzine/

  10. Kathryn Krehbiel Says:

    My dad and I are trying to piece together the German rhyme Grandpa recited while giving us knee-bounce rides. As a child, I thought it was made-up words!

    Our best effort at phonetic:

    Tross Tross Trilla,
    Der Bauer hat ein Fille
    Die filsha will nicht laufe
    der bauer will sie kaufe
    die fillsha lass sie weg
    und die bauer falls en dreck
    BOOMSDICH!

    (I heard ‘boomsdee)

    Truss,truss, trilla,
    The farmer had a filly
    The filly will not walk
    The farmer wants to sell
    The filly walks away
    The farmer fills in the ditch.
    BOOMSDEE!

  11. Monique Says:

    Kathryn, it must be this one but just put “Der Bauer hat ein Füll. Das Füllen will nicht laufen” into Google and you’ll find at least 7 sites with the lyrics.

  12. Elle Müller Says:

    Monique is right – it’s just what I was going to suggest, but her link is better as it gives two versions.

  13. Scott Says:

    I’m looking for a baby knee bounce ryme that I believe begins with Righty Clangey…. My dad said it to me but he has since passed and I would like to tell it to my son but I cant remember any of it…

    I didnt know if you by chance had run across anything that sounds or starts of similiar to it? I think it may have some old german…. Any help would be great.

    Thanks,
    Scott

  14. Kim Bruger Taffe Reilly Says:

    I don’t have any answer to the above, but questions about something else. In my parents’ homes, when growing up, they were encouraged to speak English, not German, so that’s why they spoke what we called “fractured German” – whatever they picked up from hearing it (which, I’m afraid, is far from what is correct, mixed with English!)

    Anyway, my father used to say a short rhyme to me when I was little, and then to my children, also about a little mouse running up the arm (with his two fingers playing the part of the mouse). At the end, he would gently grab the earlobe. The worst part is that we recorded him saying it on a cassette tape, which my daughter brought in to school, and the teacher never gave it back.

    It is very short, and it is written phonetically, the way I recall it, for the most part:

    Gay abyssel drefa nook
    Gay abyssel wyda
    ___ on the tucka
    and easy on the glucka! (that was when he would gently tug on the child’s ear.)

    That was pretty hopeless, wasn’t it? ;-)

    I also wanted to mention that I also remember my mother bouncing me, and then my children and my brother’s children, on her leg, but there was no accompanying song. Tnx for any help.

  15. Ruth Parks Says:

    Here’s a similar German lap rhyme that my father (aged 83) learned from his grandfather, John Albert Zecher, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He was of German descent. I’m spelling this phonetically:

    Rida rida gal (or boy)
    alta sinta mire
    inter
    minta
    grova
    belta
    mis a hominy Boomsah!

    we think the “inter, minta, grova, belta” are towns the horse & rider are going through before the rider falls of the horse (& knee). Has any one heard of this one?

  16. Beatrice Bauer Says:

    OMG I was looking for a song my dad sang to us as small children and as i was going down the list ran across one very similar. His went something like:
    Truss, Truss, Trilla,
    (kids name) hunt der filla,
    (Kids name) life der ?
    Life of (kids name) trek, trek trek (this is where u bounce kid down legs to floor)

    it meant something about child riding a pony and it bucks him off in pond

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