A French Song about Apples

Here’s a jolly French song to sing as the apple picking season draws to a close. An English translation follows the French version. Monique Palomares of Mama Lisa’s World en français is singing the song in the mp3 below…

MP3 of Pomme de reinette

Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api

Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api
Tapis, tapis rouge
Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api
Tapis, tapis gris.

Pippin Apple and Lady Apple

Pippin apple and lady apple*,
Carpet, red carpet,
Pippin apple and lady apple,
Carpet, grey carpet.

*Lady apple is one of the oldest varieties of apples.

Many thanks to Monique Palomares for contributing, translating and recording this song.

-Mama Lisa

PS I recommend you sing this song while either a) picking apples or b) cooking a delicious Tarte Tatin!

This article was posted on Wednesday, October 17th, 2007 at 7:42 pm and is filed under Children's Songs, Countries & Cultures, Folk Songs, France, French, French Folk Songs, French Kids Songs, Languages, MP3's, Recordings of Songs. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

4 Responses to “A French Song about Apples”

  1. kim Says:

    I have heard that this song is actually sung/recited by french children in the manner that american children would use eenie-meenie-miney-mo. anyone else know if this is accurate?

  2. Monique Says:

    It is. I remember that we would add “sorti!” (“out!”) at the end to eliminate the one on which “ti” would fall.

    Btw, there’s a version that goes:

    “Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api,
    D’api, d’api rouge,
    Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api,
    D’api, d’api gris.
    Cache ton poing derrière ton dos
    Ou tu auras un coup d’ marteau”

    Literal Translation:

    Pippin apple and lady apple,
    Red, red lady (apple),
    Pippin apple and lady apple,
    Grey, grey lady (apple).
    Hide your fist behind your back
    Or you’ll have a hammer blow.

    The children stand in a circle and one does the counting-out. The child on which the last syllable falls must hide his/her fist behind his/her back, the last one is “It”.

    I suppose this one is the original song, the second and last lines make sense. While in the first version of the song posted above, “tapis” (“carpet”) has no relation whatsoever with apples and must be an alteration from the original “d’api”, its meaning being long forgotten by most French people.

  3. happeulle Says:

    Excellente la recette

  4. 5yearslate Says:

    kim was rigth whit eenie-meenie-miney-mo in french song, it this:

    “iniminimanimo
    Cache ton poing derrière ton dos
    iniminimanimo
    ou t’aura un cou d’marteau.”

    But I have never hear “cache ton poing derrière ton dos” sentence for the “pomme de Reinette” song. Lisa was rigth it this:

    “Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api
    Tapis, tapis rouge
    Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api
    Tapis, tapis gris.”

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