Mama Lisa's World
International Music & Culture
A place for poems, songs, rhymes and traditions from around the world for both kids and grown-ups to enjoy!
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Belinda wrote me…

Dear Lisa,

Just an enquiry. I work in child care and would like to teach this song I learnt as a student but I have not got the full song, I believe it is an Eskimo song or I think an American Indian (song). I can only type it as I would sing it. Here I go…

Oky Toky Unga

Oky toky unga, oky toky unga,
(Children do the actions of paddling a canoe while sitting on the floor)
Hey misha, dey misha, do misha dey,
(Then the next part goes something like this…)
Hexa coola misha,hexa coola misha
(Children then stop rowing and look around with hand up at forehead then repeat the song).

Does this song sound at all famaliar? I would really love the correct words.

Belinda

If anyone can help with the lyrics to this song, please write me.

Thanks!

Lisa

UPDATE: Check the COMMENTS below for the full lyrics to this song!

For the lyrics to some other Native American songs, you can go to…

Mama Lisa’s Gabrielinos Page or
Mama Lisa’s Lipan Apache Page

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This artilce was posted on Monday, October 3rd, 2005 at 1:12 pm and is filed under American Kids Songs, Apache, Children's Songs, Countries & Cultures, Creek, Eskimo, Eskimo Songs, Folk Songs, Gabrielinos, Languages, Muscogee (Creek), Native American Indian, Native American Indian Songs, Questions. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

107 Responses to “Enquiry about Eskimo or Native American Indian Song”

  1. Elizabeth Says:

    I also have a memory of a song I sang as a Girl Scout. I recall that it was the story of an Eskimo hunter/fisherman looking for his catch. I remember the two verses you share as well others that take him through the hunt. I also recall a ‘refrain’ that goes: “eee-ss a noma mis a wa wa. eee-s a noma mis a wa wa.” Does that sound familiar? There were motions to go with each verse, too… I would LOVE to find the origins and right words for the song, as well! Thank you for asking your question so that I could happen upon the possible answer!

  2. Lisa Says:

    I was able to find the following lyrics for the song.

    Okki Tokki Unga

    Okki tokki unga, okki tokki unga,
    Hey, missa day, missa doh, missa day.
    Okki tokki unga, okki tokki unga,
    Hey, missa day, missa doh, missa day.

    If anyone else has more information, please email me.

    Lisa

  3. Donna Says:

    I was trying to find this exact song when I stumbled on your website. I, too, was looking for the correct words so I could teach it to my little son. I learned it in girl scouts, too, and I had thought there was part that went something like this (I’ll write it phonetically):
    On a takanua, On a takanua,
    Hey, missa day, missa doh, missa day.

    Missawanna, Missawanna (Bang!)
    Missawanna, Missawanna (Bang!)
    (I think that’s the part where the fisherman uses the gun?)

    My memory here is of what I learned about 30 years ago, so I may be completely off.

  4. Claire Says:

    I am also looking for the lyrics of this song to teach to Brownies. I sang it at nursery school

  5. Marty Says:

    Looking for a song that me and a friend from another part of the U.S. both know that goes something like…

    awoosha tug tug tug ahhh.

    We do not know the spelling or all the words as it was long ago. Any ideas?

  6. Claire Says:

    This song is the title song in a book called “Okki-Tokki-unga” published in UK by A & C Black Ltd.

    The words are written as follows:

    Okki-tokki-unga, Okki-tokki-unga,
    Hey, Missa Day, Missa Doh, Missa Day,

    Okki-tokki-unga, Okki-tokki-unga,
    Hey, Missa Day, Missa Doh, Missa Day

    Hexa cola misha wani
    Hexa cola misha wani
    Hexa cola misha wani

    The text next to the song says “The eskimo boy’s adventures are mimed as the verses are sung.

    I teach 5 – 6 year olds and use it as a speech rhyme rather than a song – the children always enjoy learning the strange words.

    Hope this helps!

  7. Jen Says:

    Hi There,
    I am hoping you will be able to help me. I love the track Creek Lullaby by Margaret that is featured on the deadwood Soundtrack. I believe it is a Native American song and i would like to know what the lyrics are about / is there a website with Native American Lyrics? If you can be of any help that would be great.
    Thank you
    Jen

  8. Joanne Felelr Says:

    Many, many years ago when my mother was a girl scout leader I remember her teaching us an Indian song that went something like this? Ahhh oonnie oonie ah ah oonie, ahh oonnie ah ah oonie, aie aie aie aie-ki-yay, ki-yay,aie aie aie aie-ki-yay, ki-yay a ooo a geenie keechie. And while we sang we clapped our hands on our knees back and forth to the beat on our knees, and the one sitting to the left and right of us in a circle. This is going back 45 years ago as my mom died before I was 9. Can anyone help me?? I want to teach it to my granddaughter. thank you

  9. bellamama Says:

    Regarding Creek Lullaby. this song was recorded in 1943 By Professor Willard Rhodes. Willard Rhodes was a Professor of music at Columbia University and employed by The Bureau of Indian Affairs to compile a recorded catalouge of Native American Songs. Professor Rhodes recorded a young girl named Margaret singing Creek Lullaby. Margaret attened the Haskell Institue in Lawrence, kansas. According to the Professors notes Margaret’s voice “shimmered in the room” The translation, roughly, is

    Baby, sleep, sleep, sleep.
    Father has gone to find turtle shells.
    He said he will return tomorrow.
    Baby, sleep, sleep, sleep.

    Over three thousands Native American songs are on file at the National Archive and can be traced thru the Library of Congress.

  10. Rachel Says:

    I learned the Eskimo paddling song like this.

    Atakata nuva, atakata nuva,
    hey missah day missah doe ah misah day
    Ex ecola misah wahtah, ex ecola missah wahtah
    Atakata nuva, atakata nuva, hey missah day missah doe ah missah day

    I recall that it was about paddling and preparing to go on the hunt.

  11. Bill Buckholtz Says:

    This is a little different, but for over a year now I have been combing the Internet for the the lyrics and translation of a CD recorded under the name of Spirit Nation featuring Judy Crescenzo of the Tucuhnut Tribe. The music was co-produced by David Evans and Jimmy Waldo. I believe the language is Lakota and I listen to this CD almost everyday. I am trying to contact the artist or writers, or someone familiar with this CD and can help me or direct me to someone who can. It would mean alot to me! Thanks. Bill

  12. judy Says:

    This is what was printed in an old Teacher’s Ed. music book I have–Music and You, Gd 2, Macmillan, 1988.

    Atakata Nuva Eskimo hunting song

    At-a-kat-a nu-va,
    At-a-kat-a nu-va,
    Ah mis-a-day, mis-a-do-mis-a-day.

    Hex-a col-a-mis-a wa-ta,
    Hex-a col-a-mis-a wa-ta,

    At-a-kat-a nu-va,
    At-a-kat-a nu-va,
    Ah mis-a-day, mis-a-do-mis-a-day.

  13. Lori Says:

    I learned this song in scout about 32 years ago.
    I recall the lyrics as follows: (spelling phonetically)

    Osh kash ka noon ga, osh kash ka noon ga

    Hey diddle hi diddle hey diddle ho

    Epsee cola mish a wanne, epse cola mish a wanne

    Osh kash ka noon ga, osh kash ka noon ga

    Hey diddle hi diddle hey diddle ho

    I this all that I can remember.
    Lori

  14. Anhad Says:

    OMG! So many people looking for this song! I heard it for the first time when our 2 1/2 yr old daughter performed it with her class mates yesterday. I asked the teachers the meaning of the lyrics but they did not know. They only said it is an eskimo fish hunting song. So i thought i would research it on the web but have not found the real lyrics or the meaning of the song. I hope someone finds the meaning so i can explain to our li’l girl. It might just turn out to be a collection of fun sounds with no meaning. Would love to get some inputs.

  15. Lisa Says:

    I would also love to know which group of Eskimos this song comes from, and what language it’s in.

    ****

    FYI I found the explanation of the actions that go with the song:

    “The eskimo boy’s adventures are mimed as the verses are sung.”

    First verse-throw the net out/drag the net back/Second verse-look for the fish/Third verse-Wave Good-bye

    You can purchase the book it’s in (from the UK) – click the link to get to the site to buy it online.

    The Book is called “Okki-Tokki-Unga” and it has 55 action songs in it.

  16. Lisa Says:

    Nicki Bowden was nice enough to send me a recording of her students singing Okki Tokki Unga. Click the link below to hear it…

    MP3 of Okki Tokki Unga

    Many thanks to Nicki Bowden and Class 2 Balshaw Lane Primary School for the wonderful recording!

  17. Glenda Says:

    The song that Judy printed above was the one we learned in the 1950’s by our elementary music teacher. I remember the words exactly like they are written above – (Atakata Nuva Eskimo hunting song). I remember we made canoe paddling motions and right after we would say “Hex-a col-a-mis-a wa-ta”, we would shout “bang”. Must have been the gun shooting the duck. Our teacher told us it was an Eskimo duck hunting song. Thanks for printing the words. I’ve tried to teach it to my grandchildren, but wasn’t quite sure how to pronounce it all.

  18. Julie Says:

    Does anybody have the written translation of this Native American song?

  19. amy Says:

    i am learning this song in music just now. My teacher asked us to find out where the song came from. thanks for your comments, they have been very helpful

  20. Sierra Says:

    I’m a counsler at a Girl Scout camp this summer, and we sing both the “eskimo song” and “kee-chee”, but have NO idea what any of it means! It’s nice to know we aren’t the only one’s who are stumped. I’m also amazed at how many version’s of the song there are! When we sing the eskimo song, the motions we use tell of a man who kisses his wife goodbye before he goes hunting, looks for the bear, shoots the bear, and returns home triumphant.

  21. Lisa Says:

    That’s interesting about your motions to the Eskimo song.

    I’m not familiar with the Kee-chee Song. How does that one go?

  22. Lisa Says:

    Karen wrote:

    Oky toky unga, oky toky unga,
    (Children do the actions of paddling a canoe while sitting on the floor) Hey misha, dey misha, do misha dey, (Then the next part goes something like this…) Hexa coola misha rona ,hexa coola misha rona (Children then stop rowing and look around with hand up at forehead then repeat the song).

    I’ve added the word rona, that was in it when my daughter did it at school a couple of years ago.

    Lovely song, all about clubbing a seal!

  23. Mary Chowen Says:

    NO one has mentioned the meaning of the words Okki tokki Unga- does anyone know??? I have tought this song for years as a music teacher- but would love to now the menaing.

  24. manticle Says:

    Re: Creek lullaby by Margaret translation posted by Bellamama (2006)

    “Baby, sleep, sleep, sleep.
    Father has gone to find turtle shells.
    He said he will return tomorrow.
    Baby, sleep, sleep, sleep”

    Wondering what the original native american lyrics are and what tribe/dialect?

    Thanks if anyone can help.

  25. Jess Says:

    I am in a fourth grade class and we are learning about Alaska. We have learned a song called Ata Kata Nuva and the way that we have learned it is:

    ATA KATA NUVA
    ATA KATA NUVA
    AHH MISSA DEY MISSA DEY MISSA DEY

    ATA KATA NUVA
    ATA KATA NUVA
    AHH MISSA DEY MISSA DEY MISSA DEY

    We are trying to find out what it means in English, and would love anybody’s help!!

    Thank you,
    Jess

  26. marie Says:

    my 5 year old came home singing this song and i remembered the song from when i was at primary but my son kept singing he lived in mexico! so i thought i’d look for it on the web and now i’ve found the words again we can sing it together!!!!!

  27. Maggie Says:

    I am looking for a song my grandmother sang to me in Wewoka, Oklahoma, long ago.
    Words sounded like:
    Ki mo naro
    Capn karo
    ki mo naro karo
    simmon aitchee, vommin aitchee
    latibo rigdum
    latibo rigdum ki mo.

  28. kim Says:

    I teach preschool for over 25 years and have taught the song by memory:
    (with arms crossed like saying “HOW” and rocking them)
    chorus:
    auk auk a-newka, auk auk a-newka,
    ay-mis a-daymis a-doe-mis a-day. (repeat)

    (act out kissing hand while rubbing nose)
    eskimo a-kes awana (repeat)

    same words back and forth but with different actions:
    rowing canoe, spearing for fish, hunting for bear, stirring the soup,
    drinking from bowl, yawning goodnight.

    I learned it in girl scouts in 1966 in northern IN. It is nice to know others have remembered it also. I will probably continue to teach it the way I remember.

  29. Stefanie Says:

    Hi,

    I just came across this song on the Wiggles debut CD from 1991! My son absolutely loves it, but he calls it the “walkie-talkie” song. He IS only three though. Personally, I had never heard it before. I assumed it was soemthing aboriginal, since many of their songs are from the native Austrialians or New Zealanders. Thanks for all of the information!

    Stef

  30. Safia Says:

    Joanne,
    I know Kee Chee-with hand movements in the circle and with 2 people facing each other using 2 sticks each and twirling them as well as passing them back and forth to each other. I learned it in Girl Scouts in Florida about 43 years ago.
    I can sing it to you. I was here trying to find out where it came from?I think I might have also seen it listed on another website which listed old Girl Scout song books.
    Ah uni kuni cha a uni
    Ah uni kuni cha a uni
    Ay Ay Ay iki ay kay ey
    Ay Ay Ay iki ay kay ey
    Ah u
    Ah uni
    Kee Chee.
    Safia

  31. Safia Says:

    I found more info re: Kee Chee

    STRUCTURED CURRICULUM LESSON PLAN
    Week: 7 Subject: Music Grade Level: K-3

    “Tell the children that Kee Chee is a game song that the children who live in the Democratic Republic of the Congo play. This country is located in the Southern portion of the African continent… Play the recording of Kee Chee again and ask the children to pat the steady beat. Demonstrate the hand-pat pattern. Practice by asking the children to echo each step, without the music…

    1. Pat your knees one time.
    2. Cross your hands and pat your knees one time.
    3. Uncross your hands and pat your knees one time…”

  32. Pam Says:

    I am looking for the lyrics to a Native American song and one of the lines is “We humble ourselves to the children.” Can anyone help??

  33. Kelley Says:

    So “) to find the Eskimo hunting song— thanks everyone!

    The Kee-chee song was also one we sang in Camp Fire Girls years ago and someone still in that organization could probably tell you more. I remember the words as:
    Ah woonie toonie cha, a woonie
    (repeat)
    I, I, I, ikie, I kie amos,
    (repeat)
    A woonie
    A woonie, kee-chee!
    The movements:
    start with hands up/palms facing out on ‘Ah’
    ‘woonie’ pat knees once,
    ‘toonie’ cross arms to pat opposite knees
    ‘cha’ pat knees as in ‘woonie’.
    Then repeat this same sequence throughout. At ending, hands up/palms out for “kee-chee!”
    Thanks for hosting such a swell site, Mama Lisa!

  34. jim Says:

    umiak,kiyak,muluk,tupik,are words to a song they made us sing in grade school,do you know where to find the song name?

  35. Lisa Says:

    Hi Jim,

    We haven’t found a name – but we found a little about a possible meaning on Monkey Filter:

    “umiak kayak mukluk tupik, umiak kayak mukluk tupik, umiak, a boat for many men; kayak, a boat for one man. umiak, kayak, eskimo words”.

    Does anyone else know anything about this song or the which language it’s in? We appreciate any help.

    Mama Lisa

  36. Rita Says:

    I remember this from when I was in Girl Scouts and this is all phonetic – I don’t remember at all what it meant.

    A woonie oonie kai ai oonie
    A woonie oonie kai ai oonie
    Kai ai ippie ai kai amos
    Kai ai ippie ai kai amos
    A woo
    A woonie keechie

    It was fun to sing. My sister and I would sing it even though we were in our fifties. Kids these days miss out on so much.

  37. Lisa Says:

    The following comments: Kelley’s (Oct 14th/08) + Safia’s (June 24th/08) + Joanne’s (Feb 18 /06) all refer to the Ani couni chaouani Song spelled in different ways.

    If anyone would like to sing it for us, please email me at lisa@mamalisa.com . Thanks! -Mama Lisa

  38. Angela Fisher Says:

    I am 47, living in England and I remember being taught a song called Hockta Cockta Nova…all at least that’s what I thought…it was 40 years ago. It’s been great to come on here and see what I was actually taught!!

    I was told it as an Eskimo whaling song, but then I was 7 at the time and my memory is fading!

  39. Sam Meehan Says:

    Hi,
    I’m urgently looking for the original lyrics of ‘Creek Lullaby’ by Margaret.
    Can anyone help? I can see above that a few people have requested them too.
    Thanks very much

  40. fraun Says:

    my sister and i sang this song in brownies in england 40+ yrs ago.
    for us it was:

    okta kocta noova, okta kocta noova, ay me saday me sadora me sadaym,
    okta kocta noova, okta kocta noova, ay me saday me sadora me sadaym,
    (during this part, sung at normal speed, we mimed paddling first one side and then the other of a one person kayak)

    pepsi cora misa warra, pepsi cora misa warra, (sung slowly while looking around with hand shading eyes, then pointed aha! when you spotted the whale )

    (sung very fast) okta kocta noova, okta kocta noova, ay me saday me sadora me sadaym,
    okta kocta noova, okta kocta noova, ay me saday me sadora me sadaym, (paddling much faster to catch up to the whale, then aimed and fired your harpoon)

    (sung very slowly)
    okta kocta noova, okta kocta noova, ay me saday me sadora me sadaym,
    okta kocta noova, okta kocta noova, ay me saday me sadora me sadaym, (sung very slowly as you pulled in the whale hand over hand on the end of the harpoon rope, lifted it into the kayak then,

    (normal speed as you rowed home)
    okta kocta noova, okta kocta noova, ay me saday me sadora me sadaym,
    okta kocta noova, okta kocta noova, ay me saday me sadora me sadaym,

    we are thinking it must have been a very small whale!!

  41. Greg Says:

    I’m now 42 yrs old, but in kindergarten we sang this inuit seal hunting song and I remember it well, in adition to all the actions – I still humm it from time to time:

    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day
    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day
    (sung very lively, with actions being: paddle your kayak, fist-over-fist, one stroke on the right side, then 1 stroke on the left side)

    Essa coa mishi wana, Essa coa mishi wana
    (sung slowly, while scanning the horizon for seals by putting hour hand above your brow – similar to a salute, as if shielding your eyes, and you spot a seal, so the next verse is again sung lively as you paddle over to chase the seal)

    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day
    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day

    (you now slowly throw the harpoon, overhand, and sing slowly:)
    Essa coa mishi wana, Essa coa mishi wana

    (you have speared the seal, so you race over in your kayak to retrieve it:)
    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day
    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day

    (now you must pull the heavy seal aboard your kayak – hard work, so once again sung slowly:)
    Essa coa mishi wana, Essa coa mishi wana

    (you can now paddle home to your family with a fresh kill:)

    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day
    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day
    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day
    Otikotanuva, Otikotanuva,
    Hey missa day, missa doa missa day

  42. Moira Says:

    So pleased to have found this website and mp3 of oki toki unga! My daughter will be 18 on Monday and I am putting together a cd of memorable songs from her life so far! In Primary 1 she sang this with great enthusiasm with all the added actions-happy memories!

  43. Leigh Says:

    My mom taught us an old eskimo song that she learned in girl scouts, but none of it looks like the verses you have here…

    Shannee annee mannee annee
    Ish key quu key quee kway-ah, quee kwai-ah
    Shannee annee mannee annee
    Ish key quu key quee kway-ah, quee kwai-ah

    Oh nick-o-name-o, Oh shannee annee oopah,
    Oh nick-o-name-o, Oh shannee annee oopah,
    oopah oopah oopah

    killee killee killee killee wash wash wash wash
    keyah keyah kiyah,
    killee killee killee killee wash wash wash wash
    keyah keyah kiyah,

    Oh nick-o-name-o, Oh shannee annee oopah,
    Oh nick-o-name-o, Oh shannee annee oopah,
    oopah oopah oopah

    Anyone know anything like that?

  44. rae Says:

    this song is from girl guides/girl scouts these day just wonderin if u no where it cum from here it is

    a wanna kuni ani wanni
    a wanna kuni ani wanni
    i i i ipi i i ani
    i i i ipi i i ani
    oh ye watcha mikey chi

  45. Deb Says:

    Please Help ! My niece is getting married in a few weeks and her sister wants to give a marriage toast to incorporate the some of the words from an old song or story she remembered from kindergarten.

    It starts out by Uni kuni cha cha cha… but we’d like to have the exact words. Any help that you could provide would be great.

    Thank you…

  46. Lisa Says:

    We have the lyrics to Ani couni at…

    http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=70&c=17

    Cheers!

    Mama Lisa

  47. Misty Says:

    Isn’t it funny how we all have versions of the same song. We used to do the Kee-Chee song in Girl Scouts in Arkansas, but learned it a little differently. (same hand movements, though):

    Ay uni kee-chee kah, ay uni.
    Ay uni kee-chee kah, ay uni.
    Ay Ay Ay, iki Ay Ay Ay
    Ay Ay Ay, iki Ay Ay Ay
    Ay uni kee-chee kah, ay uni. (repeat last line and get softer and softer)

  48. Watcher4416 Says:

    When i was in grade chool we used to sing a song called “the eskimo song” i think…….it went

    Umiak, Kayak, Muckluk, Tupik

    Umiak, Kayak, Muckluk, Tupik

    Umiak is a boat for many men,

    Kayak a boat for one man

    blah…blah…blah

    I dont remember the rest of the words……can someone help me out and give me the words to the entire song

    Thanks

    Greg

  49. Heather Says:

    I grew up in Canada and learned “Oki toki unga” as a child, but now live in Norway and was interested to hear that kids sing “Atte Katte Noa” to the same tune:

    Attekatte Noa, attekatte Noa.
    Emmisa, demissa dollamissa du!
    Setra kallamissa rato, setra kallamissa rato.
    Attekatte Noa, attekatte Noa.
    Emmisa, demissa dollamissa du.

    No one here seems to know where it comes from or what it means, and they don’t associate it with anything Inuit, but it’s obviously the same song, especially compared to the version that Greg and Judy remember. Wonder if Norwegians learned it through the UK version or if the Norwegian roots go way back to their own direct contact with Inuit people through their history of seafaring. Would love to believe it was the latter, and given that it’s considered a traditional historical children’s song here I’m inclined to believe they learned it directly. The song gave rise to a kids’ TV program in the ’80s and is also the name of a kid’s clothes store, which makes searching on the interntett for more info on the Norwegian version kind of tricky…

  50. Lisa Says:

    That’s interesting Heather… please let us know if you learn more about it. I’ve been getting frustrated lately by the same phenomena where searches are taken over by more popular stuff. All you can do is add a – sign to your search with a word that you don’t want in the search. So if it’s TV you don’t want in the search put at the end -TV sometimes this helps narrow down your search. Good luck! Mama Lisa

  51. Claire Says:

    The camp I usually go to sings it like this:

    Oshkosh nuga, oshkosh nuga,
    a-little i-little o-little a
    Oshkosh nuga, oshkosh nuga,
    a-little i-little o-little a

    Pepsi cola mishawannni….
    Pepsi cola mishawannni….

    Oshkosh nuga, oshkosh nuga,
    a-little i-little o-little a
    Oshkosh nuga, oshkosh nuga,
    a-little i-little o-little a!

    [repeat with Hand motions]

  52. andrew Barclay Says:

    i was beginning to think I had made this song up myself – I have a clear memory of Okki-Tokki-Unga being taught to us in yr 2 (second grade) at West Lynwood Primary (now Parkwood PS) in Australia.

    We, too, were told it was an “Eskimo” song. I’m not sure our teacher had any idea that “Eskimo” are more than one people. I have always remembered the lyrics though would not be brave enough to try to spell them here. I had forgotten the actions, but now reminded , I can picture myself doing them on the floor in the classroom.

    Until today, I had never found any incidence of it on the internet and the friends I still keep in touch with from yr 2 don’t seem to recall it (I know you would Roy, but you moved to Japan and I can’t get hold of you anymore). I had no idea the Wiggles had included it on an album – my son would be the only toddler in the world who couldn’t care less about the wiggles, wouldn’t he? – (preferred them when they were called the Cockroaches myself). I will now have to actually BUY a wiggles CD/DVD to find this wondrous song.

    Thaks to you all for the memories, and for reassuring me I have not imagined this beautiful tune. Glad I’m no tthe only one who loved it, but I’ll probably walk around the office sinign it like a twit now

  53. Marilyn Schoppet Says:

    I kept singing this old song that I learned as a child. I am an African American and most of my neighborhood was Jewish. I thought the song was derived from Hebrew.

    I wasn’t familiar of how to spell the words. But, I found this website by phonetically spelling the words a close as I could to the way we sang the song. Once I hit this website I became so excited because I instantly recognized the words.

  54. Try Says:

    Like Heather, I’m familiar with the Norwegian version, but with minor adjustments in some sounds. So, even in a small country like ours, there are variations! I thought the words were from some kind of latin heritage – stoked to hear that it’s inuit and would love for Heathers second theory to be true! (Although I doubt it… the tune is too “modern” compared to traditional Nordic music don’t you think?)

    Atte katte noa – Atte katte noa
    Emisa, demisa, dollemissa dei

    Atte katte noa – Atte katte noa
    Emisa, demisa, dollemissa dei

    Setra kollamissa rato, setra kollamissa rato.
    Atte katte noa – Atte katte noa
    Emisa, demisa, dollemissa dei

    So strange… I woke up with the “emisa, demisa”-part in my head this morning and couldn’t remember the rest. Forgot it during the day, but now, while brushing my teeth before bed, all of a sudden remembered the “Atte katte noa” and could finally google it and learn all this!

    It’s in German too… Spotify-link:
    http://open.spotify.com/track/0LWhCiPyDfRdTDVz3RKbhC

  55. janet Says:

    umiak kayak muckluck tupik. umiak kayak muckluck tuik. umiak is a boat for many men. kayak is a boat for one man .umiak kayak eskimo words learn them if you can. muckluck is an eskimo boat. tupik is an eskimo tent. if you heard an eskimo say these words you would know exactly what he meant.

  56. Safia Says:

    I found this information re: Kee Chee on scoutorama (the lyrics here don’t exactly match what I learned (written on my earlier post), but the hand positions are the same.

    Kee Chee
    Lyrics

    A wuni kuni ka yah wuni, [Repeat.]
    Ahyi yi iki ay kae ayna, [Repeat.]
    Ah ooo, ah ooo, ah dee mee KEE CHEE.

    Action
    The beginning “A” is done with hands “rumbling” on own legs, then with each time sing through the song, do a different action…
    1.Hands on own knees; hands on knees of person to the left; hands on own knees; hands on knees of person to the right.
    2. Hands on own knees; hands crossed on own knees; hands uncrossed on own knees; Left hand on knee of person to the left while right hand in knee of person to the right.
    3. Left arm extends forward; right hand touches left wrist then left shoulder; left hand crosses to to right shoulder; right arm extends forward; left hand touches right wrist then right shoulder; right hand crosses to left shoulder. (At end of song, hands are crossed, touching opposite shoulder.)

    CommentShould have Indian Chant feel. Works great when done in a circle. When you get good, speed it up!

    The youtube video of the school children singing Ani couni chaouni posted bears only a vague resemblence to the Girl Scout Kee Chee that I recall.

    Also, I reported earlier that sticks were used with Kee Chee. But I was incorrect in saying so. Sticks were used in another Girl Scout song-game ( in Florida early 1960’s) which I would like to locate the words and origin:

    The lyrics sounded like this:
    Ma kayo koee tayo
    Eh koe tahno

    Ma kayo koee tayo
    Eeh koe tahno

    One scout would sit in front of another and for the first verse strike the 2 upright wooden sticks(about 10 inches in length and about 1 inch diameter) on the floor in front of them, then strike them down so the tips that were originally upward strike the floor in front of them, and then strike their own sticks together. This motion is repeated thru the entire verse in rhythm with the chant.

    At the end of every verse, when you sing “tahno”, you again hold both sticks upright and strike both lower tips to the floor twice (once for “tah” and once for “no”)

    Verse 2 Same as 1, except instead of striking your own sticks together, you strike your right stick to your partner’s right stick

    Verse 3 Same as 1, except instead of striking your own sticks, you strike your left stick to your partner’s left stick

    Verse 4 Same as 1, except you strike both your partner’s sticks with both of your sticks from the inside out

    Verse 5 Same as 1, except you strike both your partner’s sticks with both of your sticks from the outside in

    Verse 6 Same as 1, except you gently toss your own right stick in the air with a half flip and catch it

    Verse 7 Same as 1, except you gently toss your own left stick in the air with a gentle half flip and catch it

    Verse 8, Same as 1, except you gently toss both of your own sticks in the air with a half flip and catch them

    What a fun website!

  57. Mary Says:

    It is a small world! I’m going sea kayaking for a “team building” experience at my job, and I too remembered this song from Girl Scouts (’60). The Minnesota version has the Eskimo hunter with a bow and arrow hunting walrus. Similar paddling, Essa coa mishi wana, Essa coa mishi wana (hand up to shade your eyes as you look for the walrus) and bing, instead of bang, as you hit you mark. Then slowly with effort pull in the walrus hand over hand, to the boat. Now happily sing, Atakata nuva, atakata nuva,hey missah day missah doe ah misah day
    God bless us all!

  58. Mike Says:

    My grandfather (greek) used to sing something similar to the below song. He was taught it by his mother (my great-grandmother). Anyone know the official words or translation?

    Ooom Key Shannee annee mannee annee
    Ish key quu key quee kway-ah, quee kwai-ah
    Shannee annee mannee annee
    Ish key quu key quee kway-ah, quee kwai-ah

    Oh nick-o-name-o, Oh shannee annee oopah,
    Oh nick-o-name-o, Oh shannee annee oopah,
    oopah oopah oopah

    Oh nick-o-name-o, Oh shannee annee oopah,
    Oh nick-o-name-o, Oh shannee annee oopah,
    oopah oopah oopah

    Anyone know anything like that?

  59. Lisa Says:

    Mike – Would you know what language it’s in? -Lisa

  60. Mike Says:

    Sorry. We’ve always been told that it is native american language (maybe eskimo), but I didn’t want to rule out the possibility of it being greek (since the nick-o-name-o could have just been generations mispronouncing nicodemo). Thanks.

  61. George Says:

    Here’s how we learned the Kee Chee song in Syracuse, in our Ukrainian scout group:

    A uni kuni cha a uni,

    A uni kuni cha a uni,

    Ayayay yiki ay kayevis,

    Ayayay yiki ay kayevis,

    A oo, a oo, a uni ki chi

  62. Julie Says:

    Now what I was looking for when I cam across this website was:

    what Janet said:

    February 21st, 2010 at 12:13 am
    umiak kayak muckluck tupik. umiak kayak muckluck tuik. umiak is a boat for many men. kayak is a boat for one man .umiak kayak eskimo words learn them if you can. muckluck is an eskimo boat. tupik is an eskimo tent. if you heard an eskimo say these words you would know exactly what he meant.

    Unfortunately because a kayak is not, as the words say, a boat for one man, I lost a bet even though I recalled the song from oh say almost 40 years ago in a Framingham, MA elementry school music class ;)

  63. Lani Garner Says:

    I would love to find the connection between the norwegian version and native american version of the songs. I am currently working on a paper for my ethnomusicology class specifically on the Norwegian influence of thier songs with Native American songs or vice-versa.Does anyone know the ties between the Sami and other Native American tribes in the Arctic Region?

  64. Will Says:

    I believe the song went like this…at least where I grew up in Missouri

    Osh Kosh Nuga Osh Kosh Nuga Hey diddle Hey diddle Hi Diddle Ho
    O mis o kow O mis okowani Hummmh

    The same verse over and over while acting like you are paddling……about a boy looking for his tribe and the nuga is the canoe he is paddeling and stop and shouting for his tribe members…

    Does anyone have the true full song…I learned this in the 70’s.

  65. Jan Says:

    Leigh and Mike, I recall this song, I’ve recently taught it to my 2 year old grandson but I obviously had the pronounciation all wrong, i sang it as:

    shunny money dunny money dash nee quo quee qui oh, quee qui oh.
    shunny money dunny money dash nee quo quee qui oh, quee qui oh.
    Oh hi oh dee oh, oh shunny money dee oh, oh hi oh dee oh, oh shunny money, oompah oompah oompah pah

    This song seems to have always been with me, I don’t even know when I learned it, I’m from Oklahoma and assumed it was Native American. But I would love to know the translation…………….anyone?

  66. Greg Molinaro Says:

    Here is the full version I remember from our 4th grade section on Alaska:

    umiak kayak mukluk tupik, umiak kayak mukluk tupik

    umiaaaak, a boat for many men
    kayaaaak, a boat for one man

    if you heard an Eskimo say these words
    you’ld know, exactly what he meant.

    umiak kayak mukluk tupik, umiak kayak mukluk tupik

    Mukluk is an Eskimo boot
    Tupik an Eskimo tent

    if you heard an Eskimo say these words
    you’ld know, exactly what he meant.

    umiak kayak mukluk tupik, umiak kayak mukluk tupik

    umiaaaaak, kayaaaaak,…..mukluk tupik, eskimooooo.

  67. Jonathan Becker Says:

    i don’t think that the sami people EVER had contact with native american (or first nations) peoples in the distant past. the two groups lived at too great a distance from each other, and the route between the two peoples, if anyone ever dared to traverse it, would have been quite dangerous. the vikings and norsemen may have explored parts of north america, but they may never have encountered any indigenous peoples there. so native american and eskimo songs probably had NO influence on norwegian folk songs (and vice versa).

  68. Marsha Says:

    Re: Safia’s question about the sticks back and forth. I am a Girl Scout, former leader, and the song with the stick movements is from the Phillipines. We researched lots of things Filipino for Thinking Day one year, made the sticks, and performed it for our parents. I also remembered doing it when I was a girl in Girl Scouts.
    On another note (pun intended), I remember the same words for the Kee Chee song that Safia remembered.

  69. Joan Says:

    In Camp Fire we call the sticks Lummi sticks. But recently I found several sites confirming that this is a Maori song tradition. The words are similar as is the melody and the stick movements.

    Mah Koo Ay
    Ko Tay Oh
    Ay Koo ee
    Tah – - Nah

    We also sang the Kee Chee song but we called it Ah Wooney Cooney Cha and it is in some of our song books.

  70. Darla Says:

    looking for an old indian song i sang at girl scout camp I was only 7 so i am not sure of the spelling. a woonie coon a coonie a woonie coon a coonie yi yi yi icky yi camos a woo awoo a woonie coon a woon anyone remember the words or the name of the song

  71. Monique Says:

    Darla, please read Lisa’s comments on March 6th and/or Aug. 12th 2009 above.

  72. Melissa Says:

    In response to Jonathan Becker’s post about the Sami and Native American–Jared Diamond, in his book Collapse, devotes several chapters to the Viking expansions. They did at least found community in North America, but had very poor relationships with the natives there and eventually evacuated the settlement.
    Their colony on Greenland also came into conflict with Inuit tribes who were moving into the area from the west. According to Mr. Diamond, the Norse were unable to compete because of their adherence to Norse farming and hunting methods and their refusal to learn other methods from the better adapted Inuits.
    There was a fair amount of trade between Greenland, Iceland and the homeland, so it is conceivable that the Norsemen could have transferred songs and stories back to their homeland.

  73. Melanie Says:

    I remember this song as well, eleven years ago when I was in second grade with my class. I remember that we had to use canoeing paddle motions.

    A-ta-ka-ta/ nu-va /a-ta-ka-ta/ nu-va

    A-missa day/ missa-doe-a / missa-day

    Hexa/ conn-ah/ missa- wah ta/ Hexa/ conn-ah/ missa- wah ta/

    I wonder what it could mean as well.

  74. Mary Says:

    Words to Creek Lullaby:

    Baby nota, nota, nota.
    Lasa hako kahn, i am say
    foxy no alah-ha-kay
    foxy no. i am say
    baby. baby

  75. Deanna Says:

    @ George & Darla . . .

    I was looking for the remaining words to the “a uni kuni” song.

    When I went to Girl Scout camp on many occasions, we’d sing that song. It was, as I remember it, an “Indian” – now called “Native American” rain song. It was sung to, hopefully, cause rain in the usually dry New Mexico mountains where our Girl Scout camp, Rancho del Chaparral, was located.

    I would sing it daily, during the summer, in my backyard as a child. You see, I had swimming lessons every day and I was terrified of the water . . . and of my swimming teacher, Mrs. Meyers. I will never forget her nor will I ever forget singing that song day after day. If it rained, lessons were cancelled. Little did I understand at the time, any cancelled lesson was made up at a later date. LOL! I distinctly remember the tune and the first verse or two, but couldn’t remember the rest. I think I have put it together . . . mostly thanks to George! (phonetically . . . as I have no idea how to spell the words):

    Ah uni kuni cha a uni

    Ah uni kuni cha a uni

    Ay Ay Ay iki ay kyanis

    Ay Ay Ay iki ay kyanis

    Ah u, ah u, ah uni kee chee

    So may different versions on here!! Guess I’ll always wonder where it really originated and what it really means!

  76. Jojo Says:

    Ani kouni kaha ouani
    Ani kouni kaha ouani

    Awa wo bikana kaina
    Awa wo bikana kaina

    Eaou ani bitsini
    Eaou ani bitsini

    Iroquois
    Ani couni chaouani
    Ani couni chaouani

    Awawa bikana caïna
    Awawa bikana caïna

    E aouni bissini
    E aouni bissini

    here are the lyrics for the song Deanna was asking about it is an Iroquois song if you want to hear another version listen to Oota Dabun on you tube

  77. Safia Says:

    Just located a great ethnomusicology source for the Girl Scout “stick song” or “lummi” or “lemmi sticks” as the Campfire girls and some Girl Scouts called them.

    http://folksong.org.nz/epapa/, which includes some fun you tube links.

    “Ma kayo koi tayo
    Ae koi tan no.”

    According to this site, this song is are connected to the Maori stick games of New Zealand, particularly the second verse of the song “E Papa Waiari”-the tune is different, but the similarity of the stick movements and the phonetics are unmistakable.

    If you still need someone to sing this song, or the 1960’s American Girl Scout version or “Kee Chee” (Ani kuni), I can still sing them. It is amazing to here the Iroquois, French, Spanish, and other places’ present day versions of “Ani Kuni” on youtube as suggested by an earlier post.

  78. Safia Says:

    Mama Lisa’s website has wonderful videos of E Papa Waiari and the Maori “stick game” from John Archer in New Zealand!

  79. Safia Says:

    Mama Lisa’s website has wonderful videos of the Maori E Papa Waiari stick game.

  80. Hélène Says:

    I’m looking for the lyrcs to a song called: An Indian Mother’s lullaby (First Nations)
    The beginning is: I will cover your little feet with the soft skin of a moose
    I”ll make you a dagger to wear at your belt with the feather of a goose…

  81. Mary Ashcliffe Says:

    I found this at scoutorama.com:

    Kee Chee Song

    Lyrics

    A wuni kuni ka yah wuni, [Repeat.]
    Ahyi yi iki ay kae ayna, [Repeat.]
    Ah ooo, ah ooo, ah dee mee KEE CHEE.

    Action

    The beginning “A” is done with hands “rumbling” on own legs, then with each time sing through the song, do a different action…
    1.Hands on own knees; hands on knees of person to the left; hands on own knees; hands on knees of person to the right.
    2. Hands on own knees; hands crossed on own knees; hands uncrossed on own knees; Left hand on knee of person to the left while right hand in knee of person to the right.
    3. Left arm extends forward; right hand touches left wrist then left shoulder; left hand crosses to to right shoulder; right arm extends forward; left hand touches right wrist then right shoulder; right hand crosses to left shoulder. (At end of song, hands are crossed, touching opposite shoulder.)

    Scoutorama.com

  82. Mary Ashcliffe Says:

    From gsleaders.org:

    Lummi Sticks

    Lummi Sticks is just one name for this type of activity.

    Carol Greene
    Los Gatos, California / Girl Scouts of Santa Clara County

    When I was twelve, I attended Camp Lone Tree, a Girl Scout camp in Michigan. The activity that stands out most in my mind was Lummi Sticks. We each searched the woods, found two straight sticks about 1 x 14 , and made them smooth with our pocket knives and sandpaper. Then we practiced the various moves with a partner until we got quite proficient at them. As I look back on this activity, we certainly had some brilliant camp directors to find such a popular activity that would keep us busy in our spare time for two weeks!

    Currently, much emphasis is being placed in the schools on exploring many different multi-ethnic cultures. Lummi Sticks is a game that originated with the Lummi Indians who are the farthest north of the Puget Sound tribes. (Lummi is generally pronounced with a short u, but the tribe name has a long u sound.) Other Polynesian and New Zealand cultures have similar games with different songs.

    Since it is an activity that appeals to all ages, why not try this activity with your troop. I have even taught this game to groups of sixty children at a time. The throwing moves are the only moves that I do not teach first graders. Lummi sticks can easily be made by cutting 3/4 x 36 dowels in half, but that can get costly for big groups. Here is a way to make them by recycling your old newspapers. The finished sticks are also safer since the children will be less likely to get hit with a flying stick: therefore, the children become more daring.

    Supplies:
    12 sheets newspaper approximately 14 x 24 each
    2 sheets butcher paper, fadeless, or wrapping paper approximately 8 x 14

    masking tape
    permanent pens
    white glue

    Directions:

    Place 6 sheets of newspaper on top of each other.
    Make a fold on the bottom of the pack of newspaper about 1/4-3/8. Fold over twice more until it rolls easily. Then roll into a tight tube as straight and even as possible.
    Wrap strips of masking tape around the top, bottom, then 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 of the way down the tube.
    Make the second tube the same way.
    Glue the sheets of butcher paper as you roll the paper around the tubes.
    Decorate the tubes with the permanent pens.
    I demonstrate the stick movements by first hitting the sticks on the floor 4x, then flipping them one hand at a time 4x, then tossing sticks to the other hand 4x, then flipping both sticks at the same time.
    The children are always impressed with the flipping movements, even though they are quite easy to do. Have fun becoming skillful at Lummi Sticks!

    Playing the game:
    Learn the song first since it is the glue that keeps everyone together. Then partners sit cross-legged facing each other no more than two stick lengths apart, vertically hold lower half of the sticks.

    Do each verse twice: (Change the move for #3 in each new verse.)
    Rhythm: 1-2-3- Lummi stick pattern for verse one.

    Ma koo ay 1. Hit bottom of both sticks down on floor
    G G E 2. Hit top sides of both sticks together
    1 2 3 3. Hit tip of right stick on floor.

    Ko tay o 1. Hit bottom of both sticks down on floor
    G G E 2. Hit top sides of both sticks together
    1 2 3 3. Hit tip of left stick on floor.

    Ay koo ee 1. Hit bottom of both sticks down on floor
    G F E 2. Hit top sides of both sticks together
    1 2 3 3. Hit tip of right stick on floor.

    tah — nah 1. Hit bottom of both sticks down on floor
    F D 2. Hit top sides of both sticks together
    1 2 3 3. Hit tip of left stick on floor.

    Mah koo ay 1. Hit bottom of both sticks down on floor
    F F D 2. Hit top sides of both sticks together
    1 2 3 3. Hit tip of right stick on floor.

    Ko tay o 1. Hit bottom of both sticks down on floor
    F F D 2. Hit top sides of both sticks together
    1 2 3 3. Hit tip of left stick on floor.

    Ay — koo-ee 1. Hit bottom of both sticks down on floor
    F E D 2. Hit top sides of both sticks together
    1 2 3 3. Hit tip of right stick on floor.

    tah — nah 1. Hit bottom of both sticks down on floor
    E C 2. Hit top sides of both sticks together
    1 2 3 3. Hit tip of left stick on floor.

    Other verses — the same moves for 1 & 2, then the new move for 3 beat:
    2. Tap the tips of both sticks on the floor.
    3. Hit tip of R. stick to partner s R. stick, then tip of L. stick to partner s L. stick.
    4. Partners hit both sticks together at the same time.
    5. Turn the R. stick toward your body, let go when it is straight up, and it will fall right into your upturned palm. Do the same with the L. stick.

    6. Flip both sticks at the same time.
    7. Point both sticks flat toward your partner, toss both sticks to your opposite hand by throwing the left stick over the right stick.
    8. Partners throw R. sticks to each other at exactly the same time, then L. sticks
    9. Partners throw both sticks at the same time. (One throws sticks through the center, the other throws outside, carefully keeping the sticks vertical.)

  83. Christine Says:

    I learned it this way back in the 1960’s:

    A-woonie coonie cha a woonie.
    A-woonie coonie cha a woonie.
    Eye-yi-yi-yiki-yi-ki yea moose.
    Eye-yi-yi-yiki-yi-ki yea moose.
    A-wun. A wun-i-chi-chi ahhh!

    I have no idea what it means but I still sing it to children! (smile)
    Have a great day!
    Christine Day Madsen (PS I spelled it phonetically)

  84. drew Says:

    Ani Kouni Chaouani – When the night descends on the indian village
    Awawaw bikanawh kahina – The medicine man disapears into the forest
    E aouni bissini – he touches his hand to the soil.

    Iroquois folk song .

  85. L.L. Says:

    In the Netherlands they teach this to children to improve their articulation.

    Atta Kata moeva (2x)
    E mi sa de mi sa doe la misa dee
    Atta Kata moeva (2x)
    E mi sa de mi sa doe la misa dee
    Hek sa kor la mi sa for tee (2x)
    Atta kata moeva (2x)
    E mi sa de mi sa doe la mi sa dee

  86. Laurie Says:

    I learned it a little differently through girl scouts. It was also supposed to be an Eskimo hunting a while and waving to his girlfriend or wife on shore. It went:

    Hey Mashimba mishewaka
    Hey Mashimba mishewaka (hand on forehead searching across the water for the whale)

    Aki aki umba aki aki umba
    Hey little hi little ho little hey

    Aki aki umba aki aki umba (arms folded across each other at cheat rocking back and forth like a boat)
    Hey little hi little ho little hey (waving to shore)

    Hey Mashimba mishewaka (pow) (shooting harpoon or gun motion)
    Hey Mashimba mishewaka (pow)

    Aki aki umba aki aki umba
    Hey little hi little ho little hey

    Aki aki umba aki aki umba
    Hey little hi little ho little hey

    Laurie

  87. Terri Says:

    Rita,Kelley, Safia, and George

    I also learned this song many moons ago…won’t say how many!
    It was at church camp and was called Indian Rain Chant. We sat in a circle and did the actions that Mary described.
    Not sure why, unless it is the fact that it is very dry here, that I thought about this song and decided to look it up and see if it really WAS a song!

    Terri

  88. natalie Says:

    I learnt this song at primary school in the early 90’s (uk)
    we were taught that it was about an innuit fishing, casting a net and waving to his friend.

    from memory id pronounce it as:
    Oki toki unga, oki toki unga
    hey missa day missa doe missa da
    oki toki unga, oki toki unga
    hey misssa day missa doe missa day.
    hexa tolla missawalli…

  89. George Says:

    As I remember singing this song as a child, it went like this:
    Ah uni kuni cha ah uni
    Ah uni kuni cha ah uni
    Ay yi yi iki ay ki yamoos
    Ay yi yi iki ay ki yamoos
    Ah u ah uni kee chee

    And there are hand and left arm movements as you chant: You put your left arm straight out, and on next beat put your left hand over on your right hand, on next beat put your right hand on your left shoulder; then bring your right hand cross over and put it on your left shoulder. Then you bring your left arm out and this time put your right hand on your left hand and then up to your left shoulder and then your left hand on your right shoulder. Then you pull your right arm out and start over.

    Anyway, that’s what I remember. Its been over 50 years since I did this. hahaha

  90. Bonnie N Says:

    This is the one we use to sing in grade school

    Umiak, kayak, mukluk, tupik,
    Umiak, kayak, mukluk, tupik,
    Umiak, kayak, Eskimo words,
    Learn them if you can.

    Umiak, a boat for many men,
    Kayak, a boat for one man,
    Umiak, kayak, Eskimo words,
    Learn them if you can.

    Mukluk, an Eskimo boot,
    Tupik, an Eskimo tent.
    If you heard an Eskimo say these words,
    You’d know exactly what he meant.

    Umiak, kayak, mukluk, tupik,
    Umiak, kayak, mukluk, tupik,
    Umiak, kayak,
    Eskimo words,
    Learn them if you can.

  91. Mel Says:

    My grandfather spent a fair amount of time working in the baron lands of the North West Territories, Canada. He used to sing me a lullaby when a was young and I’d really like to know the meaning and of course the correct words.

    Khee um, khee um
    Itchy gitchy washoo
    …. Missing the last two lines, remember just a blurb * pigum up pail?

  92. Koike Says:

    For anyone who would come here looking for Creek Lullaby lyrics, here they are:

    Baby, no tsa, no tsa no tsa
    Natsa hopo khan, aye yung sih
    Fox inh no a la cahr heis
    Maquedor aye yung si
    Baby no tsa, no tsa no tsa

    Found ‘em on youtube. Not sure it’s the original language though. Hope it helps.

  93. Lisa Yannucci Says:

    Maureen wrote:

    “We sang it as Camp Fire Girls in the early to mid 70’s.

    Ecksa cola misa wanta (repeat) just like you said, then it went something like,

    ‘hey misha day misha doa misha day’

    I loved that song.”

  94. nadine Says:

    ha i love that im not the only one who remembers this i was looking for it for ages, i could remember the first line and most of the actions but that was it. i found this website, but i remember there being something about a polar bear in the catch and having to shoot it with a gun?

    http://translate.google.ca/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.labbe.de/liederbaum/index.asp%3Fthemaid%3D22%26titelid%3D116&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dthe%2Bbrownies%2Bsong,%2BAtakata%2Bnuva%26hl%3Den%26tbo%3Dd%26biw%3D1366%26bih%3D643&sa=X&ei=bv4OUZOINIXWygGhm4GwBQ&ved=0CEkQ7gEwBA

    the words are:

    Atte katte Nuwa, atte katte Nuwa,
    emi sademi Sadula misa de.
    Hexa kola misa woate,
    hexa kola misa woate.

    when we did it in brownies you started off by rowing, then you search for the whale or whatever it was, paddle closer, throw the rope out, draw it back in, throw it out again, heave it over the boat, then…its all a blank, i know the tempo changed with the actions too which i loved.

  95. Sheryl Says:

    Hello..Looking for an Eskimo Song taught in Texas Elementary schools in the 1950s. sONG BOOK had illustration of Eskimos in a Kayak with a baby. We dont know the name but the lyrics remembered are something like this (phonetically)

    “aye ya yanga aye ya yanga
    eeya eeya”

    I know thats not much to go on..but maybe someone remembers or has heard of it.

  96. sofias. Says:

    the pastor in our town in germany/saxony used to sing a version of the “kee chee” song on easter parties:

    oh wuniwuni kau, oh wuni
    oh wuniwuni kau, oh wuni
    ai ai ai ike, ai ai inis
    ai ai ai ike, ai ai inis
    oh wu, oh wuni kitshi
    oh wu, oh wuni kitshi

    if i recall correctly, he referred it it as an “eskimo song”. there were some actions including clapping on your neighbors knees. awkward. :P

    anyway, it took a while to find this site with this lyrics, but it’s funny to see how many different versions there are. :D

  97. Luci Says:

    I grew up in Michigan where many towns, villages still carry aboriginal names so I was under the impression it was native to Michigan. The campfire song we sang was similar to those listed above but had a more Michigan sound to it (Onta-conta-nooga, onta-conta-nooga, a-mis-a day-mis-a, doe-mis-a day-o). We also used gestures to indicate we were paddling canoes and harpooning seals or whales. We all know different lyrics (which likely are not any aboriginal dialect). It’s remarkable that the common thread which has perpetuated is that it is an Esquimaux or Inuit hunt song. My guess is that it was of aboriginal origin but since it wasn’t a written language there were no exact word in English. Most of us learned it around campfires and never saw it written so when it was written, it was written in the various ways people heard it as it was sung. It would be interesting if the melody we all put the lyrics to was the same!

  98. julie Says:

    dear moma lisa,
    When I was little my grandmother would sing this lullaby to me, i can only remember part of the lyrics and i would truly enjoy singing it to my daughter… that is if you could help me find it. any way what i can remember went something like this. iwa iwa chante iwa iwa.

  99. Per Enger Says:

    Hello i just wanted to tell what i think about this after my little ehe search because of my interest in old Norse (Scandinavian) writings. Take it for what is is, just a fairytale :-)

    Long before Leif Erikson vent to Greenland an America (Vinland), i think long before, some of the people who lived and made carvings in rook (about 6000 years ago)of boats rowed by 60 people, went to Greenland and Vinland, and many other places.

    They were not interested in imagination of reality, but reality itself. (He he, just what i can see by old Norse writings. Eks:Håvamål)

    Noa in old Norse means now and peace (also in English, almost), Noa were also used as a Name on places.

    This is how it goes in Norway today.

    Atte katte noa
    Atte katte noa
    Emissa de missa dolla missa dei
    Setra kolla missa ratro
    Setra kolla missa ratro
    Atte katte noa
    Atte katte noa
    Emissa de missa dolla missa dei

    And my translation, my best try.. I am not translating the words direct. More like a new version.

    Who is Noa
    Where is Noa
    I miss, you miss, that which are hidden
    This world takes your mind, so you miss
    will you find Noa
    you can if you will

    My little fairytale for today :-)

  100. soderbo Says:

    Yes, I´ve heard this song. Some kindergarten kids in Stockholm, Sweden, sang (and mimed?) the “Atte Katte Noa”-version to me in the 80-ies(?). The melody was “Gubben Noak” (or “Björnen Sover”), http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=2553&c=52 björnen sover an extremely well-known Swedish children’s song (actually a drinking song from 18th century (Carl Michael Bellman, 1740-1795)).

    I don´t think there is any connection between this Inuit(?) song and Norwegian/Danish/Icelandic/Swedish folk songs, the melody is too “modern” and “european”.

    Btw, my knowledge of Inuit languages is far from good, so, please, can anyone translate the original words of “Okki-tokki-unga” or maybe this is just another one of those nonsense word songs.

    The song Leigh, Mike and Jan refer to is not Greek nor Native American. Your items are members of a Grande Famille spread round the world with relatives like “Em Pom Pi”, (”Em Bam Bi”, “Em Pom Pee”, “Om Pom Pey” …), “O Nicodemo”, (”Quick Qwack Song”, “Qui Quam Quade”, “Oompa kalli alli ammo”, …), “Hinkan, kolikoli…”, (”Kinkan Kolli Kolli …”, “Ging Gang Goo”, “Ching Gang”, …), “I Paula Tee Paula Taska” and so on. Sometimes the tune ends with 3x Umpah, Ooopah, Rumba, Amo, Kongo or something like that and Mr Nicodemo is replaced by Akkademi, Nick-o-name-o, Niccodemo, Acca dairy or other “names”. The original song is said to be from UK, Finland, Germany, Sweden, South Africa, West Africa, India, China, (French) Guyana, …

    My guess is that this song originates from Germany and was introduced in the 19th century by students in academic world; a pile of que-sounding Latin words adapted to a familiar melody. But, sadly enough, there is NO evidence so far!

  101. Per Enger Says:

    The melodies origin is not known. Carl Michael Bellman used the melodie as a play for some funnie rhymes of his own as you say. Modern come and go, if this melody is modern i hope you will give us the changing facts so the trouth can be raised as a big statue… hehe :-)

  102. soderbo Says:

    Let us discuss the origin of the song instead of arguing on topics like modern, statue and truth.

    Claire said, January 5th, 2006, “This song … published in UK by A&C Black Ltd”. When? First edition? Other UK editions? Tune/melody?

    And I do believe there is a common wish of reliable translation instead of “fairy tale”.

  103. Per Enger Says:

    Sorry about that, it was meant as a joke. Your point taken and accepted.

    Yes origin is of interest. Maybe Bellman himself has mentioned where he got the melody from. Much work to find out I think. But if it is true as Wikipedia says, then Bellman borrowed the melody from another song. Then it is a good chance he got it from the song this site is about.

    A fairy tale is not “good enough” as a common reliable translation I agree .) Still the words are very familiar with old German and old Norse.

    A good story if some of it is true he he :-)

  104. Lisa Says:

    Johanna wrote:

    Hi! I was doing my own websearch for a different indian song I learned in Girl Scouts, but this is the song I remember that was the Eskimo bear hunt:

    Osh kosh goona, osh kosh goona,
    Hey diddle, hi diddle, ho diddle hey. (Repeat both lines while paddling canoe)

    Exa cola meesha wah-nah… (shade your eyes while looking around)
    Ahh! (Point because you see something)
    Exa cola meesha wah-nah
    Ahh!

    Repeat the osh kosh part.

    I think there were other verses as the Eskimo got closer to the bear, but I can’t remember them. Anyway, your song took me on a trip down memory lane! Fun times with Girl Scouts!

    Best,
    Johanna
    Girl Scout from Missouri during the late 1970s and 80s

  105. soderbo Says:

    Eureka!

    The ”Okki-tokki-unga” song is nothing but ”exotic handicraft” produced far from Inuits!
    The Swedish ”Gubben Noak” (”Old man Noah”) migrated to Finnish language area, Mr Noak changed his name to ”Ukko Nooa” and, voilá, you´v got the embryo of the ”Inuit/Eskimo hunting/fishing song”. ”Hexa cola misha woni” probably are the relicts of the Finnish numbers ”yksi (or kaksi) kolme neljä viisi”.

    You can listen to (and read) the ”Ukko Nooa” song at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X01EgXg0pvs
    ”Okki-tokki-unga”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZarf5dPCvY
    ”Atte katte noa”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8S90WwftpE

    The detailed story about hunting/fishing, paddling, searching, aiming and so on is described in essentially two short sentences: ”Okki-tokki-unga, Hey, Missa Day, Missa Doh, Missa Day” and ”Hexa cola misha woni”. Which of these words (or syllables or letters) are corresponding to the activities mentioned above and finally, as the ”Okki-tokki-unga” song book insists, the Eskimo boy waves to a girl, overturns his kayak and has to swim to the shore to win a bride? (A&C BLACK, second edition 1994)

    Carl Michael Bellman (1740-1795), Stockholm, Sweden, created ”Gubben Noak” in the 18th century but probably he is not the composer of the music. Anyhow, I dont think he was inspired by any Inuit music and if the Inuits were inspired by him, …

    Any comments?

  106. Erin Says:

    Marty,

    Any luck finding the awoosha tug song since your post in 2005? My brother and I both remember it and will crack each other up singing it. Would love to find a recording, even though I know it’s a total long shot.

  107. Lisa Says:

    Jeffrey Adams wrote:

    Waki Taki Tumba (rowing)
    Waki Taki Tumba

    Hey missa dey mis a doa missa dey

    Hex a cola mishi waki, oooa! (here you wave)
    Hex a cola mishi waki, oooa! (wave)

    ( I have forgotten the ending, perhaps
    repeat the hey missa dey mis a doa missa dey)

    I recall this was a standard in music education for Second graders. I learned it in the 1960s so the spelling is probably way off. The song has never left my head.

    Jeffrey Adams

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