Mama Lisa's World
International Music & Culture
A place for poems, songs, rhymes and traditions from around the world for both kids and grown-ups to enjoy!
Advertisement

Barb wrote:

I am looking for an action poem that has to do with head knocker, eye blinker, nose blower, mouth chewer, chin chopper, gulla gulla gulla…but I cannot remember all of it. Can someone remember for me? I’m getting old in my young age.

Mema

If anyone can help, please let us know in the comments below.

Thanks!

Lisa

Advertisement

This artilce was posted on Wednesday, January 17th, 2007 at 12:39 pm and is filed under Australia, Countries & Cultures, English, Finger Plays, Languages, Nursery Rhymes, Questions, Readers Questions, USA, United Kingdom. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

172 Responses to “Do You Know a Rhyme That Starts… “Head Knocker, Eye Blinker,…”?”

  1. Mindy Says:

    The Wiggles sing this song–their version is slightly different from the one I learned as a child, but here it is:

    Hands on my head what is that here?
    That is my head thinker my mamma dear
    Head-thinker head-thinker
    Nicky nacky nocky noo
    That’s what they teach us at our pirate school

    Hands on my chin what is that here?
    That is my chin-wagger my mamma dear
    Chin-wagger head-thinker
    Nicky nacky nocky noo
    That’s what they teach us at our pirate school

    Hands on my waist what is that here?
    That is my waist-bender my mamma dear
    Waist-bender chin-wagger head-thinker
    Nicky nacky nocky noo
    That’s what they teach us at our pirate school

    Hands on my knees what is that here?
    That is my knee-lifter my mamma dear
    Knee-lifter waist-bender chin-wagger head-thinker
    Nicky nacky nocky noo
    That’s what they teach us at our pirate school

    Hands on my toes what is that here?
    That is my toe-tapper my mamma dear
    Toe-tapper knee-lifter waist-bender chin-wagger head-thinker
    Nicky nacky nocky noo
    That’s what they teach us at our pirate school

  2. Shane Says:

    My sister and I grew up with this finger-play and I played it with my two sons when they were little:

    “Head thinker, eye blinker, nose smeller, mouth eater, chin chopper, gully gopper!”

    You touch each part of the face as you say the rhyme,
    and with the words “gully gopper”, you tickle your child under his chin!

  3. Jo Phillips Says:

    Hi

    I know a different version and I think it has something to do with driving a carriage of horses….. who knows

    This is where the cabman sits (tap head)
    This is where he cracks his whip (tap temple)
    eyeblinker
    nose pusher
    mouth chomper
    chin chin chin chin chin chopper

  4. katie Says:

    My mom would always sing it this way and point to each eye, then our nose, then our mouth, then our chin:
    Eye Winker, Tom tinker, Nose Dropper, Mouth Eater, Chin Chomper, Gobble, Gobble, Gobble ( here she would tickle under our chin)

  5. mary Says:

    My Dad always does this one with my son:
    Head of hair (rub his head)
    Forehead bare (rub his forehead)
    Eye winker (circle right eye)
    Tom tincker (circle left eye)
    Nose dropper (circle his nose)
    Mouth eater (circle his mouth)
    Chin chopper chin chooper chin chopper (tickling his chin)

  6. Kirsten, Atl GA Says:

    Written By: Unknown Copyright Unknown; believed to have begun as an old German folksong.

    My hand on my head,
    What have I here?
    This is my top-notcher,
    My Mama dear
    Top-notcher, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my brow,
    What have I here?
    This is my sweat boxer,
    My Mama dear
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my eye,
    What have I here?
    This is my eye blinker,
    My Mama dear
    Eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my nose,
    What have I here?
    This is my smell sniffer,
    My Mama dear
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my mustache,
    What have I here?
    This is my soup strainer,
    My Mama dear
    Soup strainer,
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my mouth,
    What have I here?
    This is my food grinder,
    My Mama dear
    Food grinder, soup strainer,
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom!

    My hand on my chin,
    What have I here?
    This is my chin chopper,
    My Mama dear
    Chin chopper,
    Food grinder, soup strainer,
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my chest,
    What have I here?
    This is my air blower,
    My Mama dear
    Air blower, chin chopper,
    Food grinder, soup strainer,
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my stomach,
    What have I here?
    This is my bread basket,
    My Mama dear
    Bread basket,
    Air blower, chin chopper,
    Food grinder, soup strainer,
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my lap,
    What have I here?
    This is my lap sitter,
    My Mama dear
    Lap sitter, bread basket,
    Air blower, chin chopper,
    Food grinder, soup strainer,
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my knee,
    What have I here?
    This is my knee bender,
    My Mama dear
    Knee bender,
    Lap sitter, bread basket,
    Air blower, chin chopper,
    Food grinder, soup strainer,
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    My hand on my foot,
    What have I here?
    This is my foot stomper,
    My Mama dear
    Foot stomper, knee bender,
    Lap sitter, bread basket,
    Air blower, chin chopper,
    Food grinder, soup strainer,
    Smell sniffer, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Dickey, dickey doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Boom! Boom! (slap thighs)

    One of our friends grew up in a German-speaking church that sang this song at fun family gatherings, as shown below. With each body part, you’d put your hands on that part, and with each verse, as the list of parts grew ever longer, you’d have to point/touch faster and faster, with barely enough time to say the words.
    Hands on mineself
    Vas is das here?
    Das is my [bread basket],
    Mama, mama dear.
    Bread basket, bread basket,
    Inky, dinky doo
    Das vat ve learned in da school
    Ya, ya!

  7. Lisa Says:

    This seems to be a scout song now. You can hear the tune at a scout site – just click the link!

  8. Anna Says:

    with my hands on my head,
    what have we here?
    this is my brain thinker my teacher dear,
    brain thinker
    nicky nacky nocky noo
    that’s what they taught me when i went to school

    with my hands on my eyes
    what have we here?
    these are my eye blinkers my teacher dear,
    eye blinkers, brain thinker
    nicky nacky nocky noo
    that’s what they taught me when i went to shcool.

    with my hands on my nose,
    what have we here?
    this is my nose sniffer my teacher dear,
    nose sniffer, eye blinkers, brain thinker
    nicky nacky nocky noo
    that’s what they taught me when i went to school

    etc etc with chatterboxer, chinwagger, rubbernecker, cougher chester, bread basket, hip swingers, kneww knockers, foot stampers etc r any variation

  9. Sean Berry Says:

    Here’s one that’s been in our family through four generations along with coordinating face/head areas:

    Eye winker, Eye blinker (left eye, right eye)
    Tom Tinker, Tom Tinker (left cheek, right cheek)
    Nose Dropper, Mouth Eater (nose, mouth)
    Chin Chopper (chin)
    GubbieS! GUBBIES!!! GUBBIES!!!!! (neck)

  10. Mare Says:

    Hand on my heart, what is das here? Das is my tinker boxer my mama dear.

    Tinkerboxer
    Eye Blinker
    Cheese Smeller
    Crumb Duster
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Chopper

    I can’t think of the rest either.

    Wingy wing wang woo. Thats what I learned in my school ya ya!

  11. Philip Says:

    This version has been passed down through our family;

    This is where the cat sits (touch forehead)
    This is where he jumps to (between eyebrows)
    Eye winker (touch eye)
    Nose twinker (touch nose)
    Mouth eater (touch mouth)
    Chin chopper (touch chin)
    Belly buster (big tickle on tummy)

  12. Ann Vise Says:

    I learned this in Scouts:

    I said to myself,
    Vas ist das here?
    Das ist mine head-thinker my Momma dear.
    Head thinker head thinker das ist der rule,
    Das vas I learn in der School!

    going down to

    Foot stomper, knee bender, bread basket [for tummy], hand toucher, chin chomper, mouth taster, nose smeller, ear listener, eye looker, head thinker,
    Das ist der rule,
    Das vas I learn in der School!

    We used to have a lot of fun with that. We were eight years old and had no idea that the song might be mocking a German accent or the process of the child of a German immigrant learning English. But that is what it may have been. And of course we touched each relevant part as it was mentioned. We sat Indian style in a circle when we sang it.

  13. Tom Chism Says:

    The version I learned from my father and have passed on to my own children is as follows:

    Forebumper (tuch the forehead)
    Eye winker (touch just below the eye)
    Nose smeller ( tip of the nose)
    Mouth eater (the lower lip)
    Chinny choper ( the chin)
    Tom tinker (pinch the cheek)

    followed by tickling under the the chin or all over with (gitcha gitcha gitcha)

  14. Lara Heady Says:

    I love all the different versions. I thought I’d add my family’s version. My Dad did this so often that even as an adult I’ll start laughing uncontrollably if he starts the rhyme and points at me.

    Eye winker (touch right eye)
    Tom tinker (touch left eye)
    Nose breather (touch nose)
    Mouth eater (touch mouth)
    Chin chucker (touch chin)
    (pause)
    gully gully gully gully ….. (while tickling neck)

  15. Debra, Cleveland Says:

    I also grew up with this song, in the Amish country,
    I think our hands were “noodle maker”.

    eyeblinker, headknocker,
    inkydinky do,
    dat’s vat ve learnt in de school, ya ya.

  16. Deanna Says:

    My dad always did it this way:

    Here’s where the kitty sits(point to top of forehead)
    Here’s where he jumps(point to just above eye)
    Eye winker(point to one eye lid)
    Tom Tinker(point to other eye lid)
    Nose Dropper(point to nose)
    Mouth Eater(point to mouth)
    Chin Chomper(point to chin)
    Then make tickling noises as you tickle under the chin

  17. Bob Says:

    I have no idea where I heard this, but I did it to my kids when they were babies, and now to their children.

    Forehead knocker ….touching the forehead
    Eye peeper……touching the side of their eye
    nose dropper…..touching their nose
    mouth eater….touching the side of their mouth
    chin chopper…..touching their chin
    gully gully gully…..tickling their neck under the chin.

  18. MAry Beth Says:

    hey,
    my version is so totally different, it has been passed down… fore bumper, (forehead) eye winker, tom tinker (eyes) nose smeller, cheek cherry, cheek cherry, mouth eater chin gully gully. (Then you tickle their chin.)

  19. Lawrence Says:

    I learned a different version from my three older sisters in the ’50s:

    Hands on my chest [cross hands on chest)],
    do-si-do here [uncross hands and put on shoulders],
    do-si my head bumper my momma dear,
    Head bumper, gully gully gully goo,
    That’s what I learned in the school-la.

    Hands on my chest, do-si-do here,
    Do-si my eye winker my momma dear,
    Head bumper, eye winker,
    gully, gully, gully, goo,
    That’s what I learned in the school-la.

    Our facial names were head bumper, eye winker, eye blinker, nose dropper, mouth eater, chin chopper, and gully gully. I’m interested in the extra words of “gully goo,” do-si-do,” and “school-la.” I think we had names for the ears, but I can’t remember what they were.

  20. Leslie Says:

    My mom did one that started on our forehead with “here sits a mousey, eating cream and cheese…” then proceeded to the respective parts of our face with “eye winker, tom tinker (for the second eye), nose smeller, mouth eater, chin chopper, coochie coochie coo” then would tickle us under the chin.

    I was looking online to see if anyone had heard this before (none of my friends had) and stumbled upon your site here, it’s quite interesting to see the random versions of such a similar thing.

  21. Nancy Says:

    Here’s where the coachman sits (forehead)
    Here’s where he cracks his whip (bridge of nose)
    Eye winker
    Tom Tinker
    Nose Dropper
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Upper
    Chin Upper
    Chin Upper

  22. Lisa Says:

    I found this one in a book of old nursery rhymes:

    BROW brinky,
    Eye winky,
    Chin choppy,
    Nose noppy,
    Cheek cherry,
    Mouth merry.

  23. S. Smith Says:

    “Head Bender, Eye Peeper, Nose Popper, Mouth Feeder, Chin Chopper,
    Gully, Gully Gully (neck)

  24. lisa b Says:

    eye winker(left eye), tom tinker (right eye), nose dropper, mouth eater, chin chatter, the go down cellar, the go down celler (tickling neck and chest)

  25. Jan Says:

    So many versions … mine is closer to Anna’s

    With my hands on my head, what have I here?
    This is my … ….. please teacher, dear

    foot-stompers
    knee-knockers
    thigh-benders
    hip-swingers
    bread basket
    chest-protector
    rubber-necker
    chin-a -wagger
    chatterboxer
    smelly-boxer
    eye blinkers
    brain thinker
    Nicky -nicky – noo ….
    That’s what they taught me
    When I went to School

    I’m sure I’ve forgotten some

  26. Abi Says:

    I learned this song from my father, who had parents of German ancestry. He always sang it with an accent:
    “Head thinker, eye winker, nose smeller, soup strainer (mustache), girl kisser, bread basket (belly) oo, la, oo, la, oo, Dat’s vat ve lernt in de Schulehaus.”

  27. Kristi Says:

    My dad and Grandma used to sing this to me when I was a little girl.

    Head acher, Eye blinker, Tom tinker (the other eye), Nose dopper, Mouth chewer, Chin chopper, (tickle tickle under the chin) for gully gully.

  28. michelle Says:

    thank you sooooooo much forthe words i had the tune in my head and everyone i asked thought i was making this song up. at last now i can sing it to myself at work, without too many mistakes

  29. dee Says:

    Ours goes:
    Here’s where the coachman sits,
    Here’s where he cracks his whip.
    Eye winker,
    Tom blinker,
    Nose dropper,
    Mouth eater,
    Chinny chinny chopper!
    If you’ve ever read or seen Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, Mercutio (sp?) gives a lovely speech about the fairy queen and I have to believe our little children’s poem is derivedn from that speech. My mom did it to us, I did it to my 5, and now they are doing it to their children! And how they love the chin tickles at the end!

  30. Trisha Keller Says:

    We also had a rhyme in my family that I now do with my little ones it goes…
    Car Fender (touch forehead)
    Eye Winker (eye)
    Tom Tinker (other eye)
    Nose Dropper (nose)
    Mouth Eater (mouth)
    Chin chopper (chin)
    Get’cha, Get’cha, Get’cha (tickle under chin or belly)

    Very interesting to see the variations – I thought this one was just in my family too – none of my other mommy friends had heard it or anything like it.

  31. Carla Says:

    I recall my family’s version as…
    Forebender
    Eye Winker
    Tom Tinker
    Nose Smeller
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Chucker
    Gully, Gully, Gully!

  32. Nikki Says:

    The one my father did (and I now do with/to my daughter) was:
    Noggin Knocker (touch forehead)
    Eye Winker (point to eye)
    Eye Blinker (point to other eye)
    Nose Smeller (poke nose)
    Mouth eater (touch lips)
    Chin Chomper (touch chin)
    Get ‘er get ‘er get ‘er get ‘er (tickle under chin)
    (”Get ‘im” if it’s a boy)

  33. John Says:

    This is the version I learned from my Irish Grandmother. I think this may be a specifically Irish version:
    You point to each body part, and tickle under the chin at the end with the “Gully gully gully” part.

    Headacher
    Eye-blinker, Eye-winker
    Nosedropper
    Sweet-cheek, sour-cheek
    Moutheater
    Chin-chopper
    Gully, gully, gully

    I’d ask her to do it for hours. My little boy wanted me to do the same when he was about four.

  34. Lisa Says:

    That’s neat!

    I just found this rhyme that ends with the chin chopper that’s in many of the versions above (though it’s almost a different rhyme all together):

    Knock at the door, (forehead)
    And peep in, (lift eyelids)
    Open the door, (mouth)
    And walk in.
    Chinchopper, chinchopper,
    Chinchopper chin!

  35. Lisa Says:

    Here’s another version I found:

    Here sits the Lord Mayor, (touching forehead)
    Here sit his two men, (eyes)
    Here sits the cock, (right cheek)
    Here sits the hen, (left cheek)
    Here sit the little chickens, (tip of nose)
    Here they all run in; (mouth)
    Chinchopper, chinchopper,
    Chinchopper chin! (chuck the chin)

  36. Vanesa Says:

    foredinker
    eyewinker
    tomtinker
    nosedropper
    moutheater
    chinchomper
    giddygiddygiddy

  37. Marianne Says:

    There are a few my family would sing on camping trips and around camp fires they were….

    My hand on my heart and what is this here
    this is my top notcher my momma drear\top knotcher inky dinky do thats what i learned at the school
    my hand on my heart and what is this here
    this is my sweat boxer my momma dear
    sweat boxer, top knotcher inky dinky do
    thats what i learned at the school ( and so forth)

    then there was one that my mom would put her index and middle finger on top our head and walk down out face saying

    (from top of the head to our forhead)
    this is the way the pussy cat comes
    (knocks on forhead)
    knocks on the door
    (lifting eye lid)
    peeps in
    (lifts nose)
    opens the latch
    (softly tickling lips)
    walks in
    (tickling under the chin)
    Chinny Chop Chinny chop Chinny chop

    Or she would take our hand and make a circle in the palm of our hand 3 times while saying

    round and around the garden like a teddy bear
    ( walking fingers up for arm)
    One step two step tickle under there (tickling our arm pit)

    I have also heard this one but in stead of tickle under there is is tickle every where and you just tickle the child.

  38. Carmen Says:

    My husband and I were discussing what the correct words are; seems like all are correct to me. Here’s the Oklahoma version:

    Ford Bumper (forehead…and yes, like the truck.)
    Tom Tinker (left eye)
    Eye Winker (right eye)
    Nose Beeper (nose… like the horn, I suppose?)
    Mouth Chewer
    Chin Chopper

    Chewy, Chewy, Chewy! (grab the chin and shake it a little.)

  39. Charlotte Says:

    I was doing this rhyme with my grandson, that my mother did to my kids and her grandmother did to her…just started wondering if anyone else knew it or what. Thought it was funny!!! Ours went a little different.

    Louse bed (touch the head)
    Forehead (touch the forehead)
    Eye Winker (touch the left eye)
    Tommy Tinker (touch the right eye)
    Nose Smeller (touch the nose)
    Mouth Eater (touch the mouth)
    Chin Chopper (touch the chin)
    Then tickle them under the chin. So cute when the child pulls their chin in to their chest anticipating being tickled. Fun Fun

  40. caroline Says:

    From my grandpa:

    Mousie bed
    Forehead
    Eye winker
    Tom tinker
    Nose dropper
    Mouth eater
    Chin chopper chin chopper chin chopper chin

  41. angie Says:

    Hey everyone above us, we too were looking for the lyrics to this song and had great enjoyment seeing all the different variations. Makes the world a little more connected seeing how many people know this tune.

    cheers.

  42. Heather Says:

    This is my mother-in-law’s version…

    Hand on myself, what is this here, this is my headknocker mama, my dear, headknocker, headknocker nick nicky doo, that’s what I learned in the school, Ya, Ya

    and then…
    eye blinker
    nose blower
    soup strainer
    rubbernecker
    chest protector
    breadbasket
    sitter-downer
    knee bender
    flat footer

  43. C Brown Says:

    I am looking for the rest of the rhyme
    Eye Brow brinky
    Eye eye winky
    Cheek cheek merry
    Nose nose cherry
    Chin chopper, chin chopper

    The rest goes down the body to knee knockers.

  44. Arlene Says:

    Our first grandchild was born this past Dec.; this song popped into my head last week as I sang and talked to him. I remember it from my childhood in the 50s in Cincinnati; since Cincy is an old German community, that version is the one I remember being most like what my mother sang, with the refrain being ‘inky dinky do’. I could also perhaps have sung the song in Brownies.
    Amazing how so many of those memories deeply imbedded in our brains resurface with the advent of grandchildren!

  45. Sarah Says:

    This is the version that my Grandfather always did with us, he was French Canadian.
    Headacher (touch the forehead)
    Eyewinker (touch the eye)
    Nosedropper (touch the nose)
    Moutheater (touch the nose)
    Chinchopper (touch the chin)
    Giddy, Giddy, Giddy! (tickle under the chin)

    When my husband saw me doing this with our young son he responded that it is supposed to go like this:
    Head Thinker
    Eye Blinker
    Nose Smeller
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Chopper
    Giddy, Giddy, Giddy!

    Who knew that there were so many versions?? I thought this was something that my Grandfather made up and I had no idea that it was a song…wonder what the tune is?

  46. Lisa Says:

    I always thought it was more of a rhyme. Do other people sing it or say it like a rhyme?

  47. Mary Says:

    Wow – so many versions…I’m surprised that mine is a bit different still. My father was of German decent and this is how he said it:

    Here’s where the Dutchman sits – top of head
    Here’s where he cracks his whip – forehead
    Eye winker, eye blinker – eyes
    Nose dropper – nose
    Mouth eater – mouth
    And, chinny chin chin – chucks under chin

    I loved this interactive rhyme

  48. Margaret Says:

    Lisa and Sarah, yes certainly has a tune, think its a German waltz tune. Mostly the same here, except we had
    …chin wagger, nose wiper, ear listeners, eye peepers, head thinker and nicky nicky noo
    Cant think of Dad’s mouth version for the moment.

  49. bridgett Says:

    Lord Mayor was our version…and while it made a little story, I never could figure out (once I was an adult) what the heck it was all about. Thanks for this thread!

  50. Kate Says:

    Eye Winker, Tom Tinker, Nose Sniffer, Mouth Eater, Chin Chupper, Chin Chupper, Chin.

  51. caroline Says:

    head of hair forehead bare
    eye winker
    tommy tinker
    nose dropper
    mouth eater
    chin chopper chin chin

  52. caroline Says:

    this is the version i learned from my nana here in ireland

  53. Rayne Says:

    My hand on my self, what is this here?
    This is my … , my momma dear,

    Foot Stomper
    Knee Knocker
    Hip Bouncer
    Breadbasket
    Chest Wheezer
    Shoulder Shrugger
    Rubbernecker
    Chin Chopper
    Cookie Duster
    Nose Blower
    Eye Winker
    Head Knocker

    Inky Dinky Doo
    That’s what I learned at Day Camp.
    Yah Yah!

  54. Lisa Says:

    These are very cool!

    Mama Lisa

  55. Murphy Henry Says:

    This is one reason I love the internet! I learned this song in first grade in Georgia and for years have puzzled over what the words in my head really were. (I’m a musician–banjo player–and words & tunes just stay in my head.) I also “heard” it in a German accent. But I never could figure out what “vatdasdis here” meant. Until I read all these versions! Surely it means “what does this here?” So my version went:

    My hands on my head
    Vat das dis here
    That is my sweat boxer Mama my dear
    Sweat boxer, sweat boxer, nicky, nicky, nicky noo,
    That’s what I learned at the school.

    The tune I know is in quick waltz time, maybe even 6/8. Thanks for helping me clear this up!

  56. Ann Blanchard Says:

    I remember sitting on my Grandmothers knee and she would start so gently with her finger going over my hair:

    This is where the coachman sits,
    This is where he cracks his whip (forehead)
    Head of hair (back to hair again)
    Forehead fair (forehead again)
    Eye winker (left eye)
    Tom Tinker (right eye)
    Nose smeller (nose)
    Mouth Eater (nose)
    Chin Chopper (point of chin)
    And tickle you under there……… (tickles starting and neck and over
    body, accompanied by gales of laughter on both sides)

    My little grandchildren loved it too, but I never knew it came from
    Germany till now. Loved all the different version, but love ours best!

  57. Robert August Says:

    I have a slightly different version that my dad used to sing when I was a child. He learned it from his parents that were Lithuanian imigrants to America.

    With my hand on myself, vas ist das here.
    Das is my head tinker, ya mamma dear.
    Thats what we learn in da school YA YA!

    REAPEATS:
    Head Tinker (head)
    Sweat Browser (fore head)
    Eye Tinker (eye)
    Soup Strainer (under nose)
    Chin Chowser (chin)
    Rubber Necker (neck)
    Chest Protector (chest)
    Bread Basket (stomach)
    Baby Bouncer (Knee)
    Wife Kicker (Foot)

    … i may have missed one, its been awhile.
    I listened to the tune on the Scout website and
    thats the tune.

  58. Jenny C. Says:

    My mom from Oklahoma did it this way, which I now do in Arkansas:

    “FIRE” bumper (probably mutated from “fore” bumper)
    Tom tinker
    eye seer
    nose smeller
    chin chopper
    gully gully gully! (while grabbing chin and chomping it up and down
    very quickly)

  59. Matt Says:

    My grandfather had a version of this that has been passed throughout our family. I’ve always played the game with my younger relatives, and tonight my wife was arguing that it was nonsense that my grandpa made up. Off to google, which brings me here.
    Reading all the different versions all so similar is fascinating, but my granddad’s specific take on it isn’t quite here, so I’ll add it:

    Fore Bumper
    Eye Winker
    Tom Tinker
    Nose Smeller
    Mouth Eater
    Neck Twister
    Bread Box (this is where the tickling comes :) )

    thanks everyone.

  60. Jenny Says:

    My hand on my self, what is this here, this is my ____my momma dear…

    chin chopper
    milk pusher
    nose blower
    eye winker
    sweat boxer
    etc…

    ….nicky nicky new ….and that’s what I learned at this camp !

  61. manu k Says:

    chin chopper
    milk pusher
    nose blower
    eye winker
    sweat boxer
    etc…

  62. Liz Hegarty Says:

    We used to sing this in brownies but it was a little different..

    With my hands on my knees, what have I here
    this is mybrainbox and nothing to fear
    brain box and willy willy woo
    That’s what they taught me when i went to school

    eye-blinker
    snitch-wiper
    soup strainer
    bread-basket
    hip-wiggler
    knee-bender
    toe-tapper

  63. sara Says:

    we have heard two versions
    head knocker
    eye winker
    nose dropper
    mouth feeder
    chin chooper
    gully gully gully gully gully

    head knocker
    eye winker
    nose mary
    lip lily
    chin chilly
    gilly gilly gilly

  64. Kim Says:

    The version that I remember my grandmother (in the 60’s) doing to us, and my mother now doing to my children, is:

    Farbumper (touch forehead)
    Eye Winker (touch one eye)
    Tom Tinker (touch other eye)
    Nose Dropper (touch nose)
    Mouth Eater (touch mouth)
    Chin Chopper (touch chin)
    Gully Gully Gully Gully (tickle neck area)

  65. Erica Says:

    I learned:
    “Put your hands on my shoulders and vas is das here, this my tinkerboxer oh mama dear! Tinkerboxer, ringee digee do, thats what i learned in this school… YA HOO”!

    Tinkerboxer
    Headknocker
    Sweat browser
    Eye blinker
    Snot blower
    Soup strainer
    …..

  66. Sue Says:

    Like Arlene above, I grew up in Cinti. in the 50’s and learned this song in Brownies. The following are the lyrics I learned:

    Hands on my hips,
    What have we here?
    This is my foot stomper,
    My Mama dear
    Foot stomper, knee bender,
    Lap sitter, bread basket,
    Air blower, apple knocker,
    chin chopper,
    Food grinder, soup strainer,
    horn blower, eye blinker,
    Sweat boxer, top-notcher,
    Inky, dinky doo
    That’s what I learned in my school.
    Tra lah

  67. Sarah O Says:

    Well, my mama and uncle would not sing it, it was more of the child knowing they’d get tickled underneath the chin and it was fun.. My family’s version isnt very different, but here it is:

    forebumper (single tap to the forehead)

    Eyepeeper (single tap to the eye (usually the kid closes them, lol))

    Nosesmeller (single tap to the tip of the nose)

    At this point the child starts tucking in their chin to kind of block what’s coming

    Moutheater (single tap to the lips)

    Chinchumper (single tap to the chin)

    Here at this point there is an extended pause, as if trying to let the child relax

    Gullywhopper! (tickle attack to the neck)

  68. Julie Read Says:

    Wow! This songs been in my family for generations too! They’ll be fascinated to learn it’s of German origin. This is the English West country version I know (It has a lovely tune too!) We point to the various parts of the body as we sing

    With my hands on my head, what have I here
    This is my brain boxer my teacher dear
    Brain boxer, nicky , nicky, nacky, noo
    That’s what they taught me when I went to school

    With my hands on my head, What have I here
    These are my eye blinkers my teacher dear
    Eye blinkers, brain boxer, nicky , nicky, nacky, noo
    That’s what they taught me when I went to school

    continues in the same vein with
    nose wiper (obvious!)
    tea strainer (mouth)
    chin wagger (um..chin!)
    bread basket (tummy)
    back acher (back)
    trouble maker (one guess!)
    wind breaker (bottom)
    knee knockers (knees)
    globe trotters (feet)

    Last verse also ends really quickly with the little ones in the family desperately trying to keep up! Fab. I love the way we in true west country style have appeared to have added “er” onto nearly every line too. Great stuff!

  69. SN Says:

    I was searching for a similar poem that was taught to me in the 70s . My kindergarten teacher was taught this in pre-independence India by the British teachers.

    Brain boxes (head)
    Sweat Boxes (temple)
    Bulrushes(eye brows)
    Eye blinkers (eyes)
    Snuff boxes (nose)
    Chatter boxes (mouth/teeth)
    Bread boxes (stomach)
    Knee benders (knees)

    If someone has the words to this variation, please post it – I would love to teach it to my kids.

  70. oneblankspace Says:

    I have also heard it with snot locker/ schnotlocker for the nose.

  71. Dana Says:

    My Grandfather sings a similar song:
    With my hands on my shoulder now vat is dis here this is my:
    top notcher, top notcher dear. Top nothcher, Top notcher, top notcher dear. thats what i learned in school.
    sweat browser
    eye blinker
    snot blower
    soup strainer
    bull thrower
    chin chowser
    rubber necker
    milk factory
    bread basket
    trouble maker
    poop shooter
    knee knocker

  72. CareBear Says:

    We do this song all the time in Canada with our Girl Guides!!! Our version is a little more girlie!!!

    I point to myself, what is this here? This is my brain boxer yeah momma dear. Brain boxer, ring a ling a ling, toot toot! that’s what I learned at my school today.

    Brain boxer
    Eye Blinker
    Telephoner
    Nose Blower
    Boy Kisser
    Rubber Necker
    Chest Protector
    Bread Basket
    Sit-Upon (tush)
    Knee Knockers
    Boy Kicker (foot, we usually don’t encourage this one!)

  73. Ma2Twins Says:

    I was just singing this with my 10 year olds and they wanted me to look it up on the net. Ours was passed down for generations… might have been modified in the process:

    What is this my son
    What is this, what is this (pointing to top of head)
    This is my Hard Knocker
    That’s what it is
    Hard Knocker doodle do
    That’s what we learn in the School.

    (Keep adding body parts until the last verse goes like this:)

    What is this my son
    What is this, what is this
    This is my Foot Stomper
    That’s what it is
    Foot Stomper
    Knee Knocker
    Sit Downer
    Beer Belly
    Chest Maker
    Bird Nester (chin/beard)
    Boy (Girl) Kisser
    Soup Strainer (the channel between the nose and lips)
    Stink Smeller
    Eye See You
    Sweat Brower (forehead)
    Hard Knocker Doodle Do
    That’s what we learn in the School!

  74. kygal Says:

    I grew up in rural Kentucky and here’s what I was sung

    Benfore *taps forehead
    Eyewinker *taps under left eye
    Tom Tinker *taps under right eye
    Nose Smeller *taps nose
    Mouth Eater *taps mouth
    Chin Chopper *taps chin
    Whee Whee Whee *tickles under chin

    It’s cool to find out it’s still around isn’t it? Like a small pocket of our collective childhoods lives on. Sweet!

  75. Amy Says:

    We did this as a family, similar, but different (no song):
    Knock on the door (knock on forehead)
    Peep in (pretend to peep into their eyes)
    Open the latch (push up on nose)
    Walk in (open the mouth)
    chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chin (tickle under the chin)

  76. Megan Says:

    This was passed down from my great- grandfather

    Mousetrap- Forehead
    Forban- Forehead
    eye-winker- left eye
    tom-tinker- right eye
    nose puller
    mouth chewer
    chin chopper
    gully, gully, gully

  77. Patrick in Oz Says:

    Yes, “knock on the door” was dads favourite …which was a great amusement when I was a tot.
    One Australian version of “chin-chopper” etc goes:-

    “With my hand on my heart, what have I here -
    This is my (chin-chopper) …jolly good cheer -
    Chin-chopper, nose-rosy, eye-peeper, thinking-box and nicky-nicky-noo -
    …thats what they taught me when I went to school.

    There are “bits” for the whole body …but I can’t recall too many others ;-(

  78. Christina Says:

    I point to myself and say what is this here this is my Brain boxer oh momma dear
    Brain boxer -head
    Eye blinker- eyes
    Nose blower-nose
    Boy Kisser- mouth
    Rubber necker- neck
    Chest protector-chest
    Bread Basket-stomach
    Sit Upon- butt
    Knee Bender -Knee
    Boy Kicker-feet

    Ring a ding a ling toot toot thats what I learned at my school ya ya

  79. Mick68 Says:

    I learned this song in a music class in elementary school in West Texas in the 70’s. It was in our music book. Our version was slightly different:
    Vas ist das, my son
    Vas ist das, Vas ist das?
    Das ist my hat-racker, my father dear.
    Hat-racker, ooh-la, ooh-la
    Dast vat we learned in the Schule haus.

    Eye blinker
    Nose Smeller
    Mouth Eater

    There were more but I can’t rememer them all.

  80. Nancy Says:

    “I asked my Mom, vot I got here. Dat is yer shwet boxer, ah momma dear, dats vat I learnt in da school, ya hoo.
    I asked my Mom, vot I got here. Dat is yer eye peeper, ah momma dear. Eye peeper, shwet boxer my momma dear. Dats vot I learnt in da school, ya hoo.
    Then….
    nose blower
    lip locker
    soup catcher(chin)
    heart thumper (chest)
    bread basket,(stomach)
    babe holder(lap)
    long walkers (legs)
    bug stompers (feet)
    My mama dear, dats vot we learnt in da school, ya hoo!

  81. Kathy Says:

    Head knocker ( rap on head)
    Eye blinker ( touch eye area )
    Tommy tinker ( touch other eye area )
    Nose blower (pull nose)
    mouth eater ( touch lips )
    chin chopper ( squeeze chin )
    and gully gully gully ( tickle neck)

  82. EMJ Says:

    The semi-english version of the German song my Father and his 7 brothers and sisters sang was a bit different. Starting with -
    So I points to myself and say “Vas is das here?
    Das is my “Sweat brower” mine Father dear. That’s what I learned in my school. And so on…..
    eye blinker
    cheese smeller
    bull shooter
    rubber necker
    chest protector
    belly acher
    trouble maker
    wind blower
    knee bender
    toe jammer

  83. Gail Says:

    My Grandmother did;

    around forehead (make circle with finger)
    eye wink (touch side of eye on head)
    nose drop (touch nose)
    chin chop (pinch chin gently)
    AND
    a goolie, a goolie, a goolie while tickling the tummy….

  84. miranda Says:

    Thank you so much for all the time and effort here….BRAVO!… the internet….I write & illustrate children’s stories…..some years ago I was totally captivated by my nephew at 4 years ….he would add ‘Nicky Nocky Noo’ on to the end of everything he said…..’i just drank a glass of milk… nicky nocky noo’….’I am going to play outside …nicky nocky noo’….’i am going to bed now…nicky nocky noo’…..etc etc…..I couldn’t work out why?…but at the same time it was also familar to me somehow…..after reading all these absolutely wonderful accounts here…..I am embarrassed to say that my family sang a version of this rhyme to me and my siblings…..I had forgotten the details….but the rhythm of my nephew’s ‘nicky nocky noo’ was firmly programmed into my memory bank……and now thanks to you all I have started to piece together my childhood memory of this sweet little ditty. I wish I had done so earlier…for me teenage phase is in full swing now!!!!……thank you!

  85. miranda Says:

    thank you

  86. Raffaela Says:

    The version i remember was:

    I point to myself right here, right here
    This is my tree topper, yes mother dear
    tree topper, tree topper, yes mother dear
    That’s what i learned in the school.

  87. Callie Says:

    Head Thinker
    Eye Winker
    Nose Stinker
    Cheek Cheater
    Mouth Eater
    Chin chopper – chin chopper – chin chopper

  88. Kathleen Says:

    Ok I learned this song in Sunday School way back in the 60’s and I am 53 now lol
    Hands on my hips what should I do?
    This is my eye blinkers God gave to me
    Hands on my hips what should I do I do?
    This is my food grinder God gave to me
    Eye Blinker ~ Food Grinder

    But alas I do not know the rest

  89. Lorri Says:

    My mom’s version was

    Headacher
    Tom tinker
    Eye winker
    Nose dropper
    Mouth eater
    Chin Chopper
    (then tickle and say “get that little girl)

  90. Nathan Says:

    I learned a slightly sillier version, but it was always very important that it be done with a thick, goofy German accent:

    Mein Hand an Meinself,
    Was ist das hier?
    Hand an mein Kopfthinker, my mama dear.
    Kopfthinker, nicky nicky noo (WOO-WOO!)
    That’s what I learned at der Camp. Ja, Ja!

    All the way down with…
    Eyewinker
    Schnitzel Hole
    Chest Boxer
    Bread Basket
    Butt Sitter
    Knee Bender (K-nee, pronounce the K)
    Fuss Kicker

    The Wiggles version is downright creepy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXAnbIbK-kU

  91. Jeri Says:

    My English/Scots Irish Grandma and my mother said this:
    Here’s where the kitty walks (smooth one eyebrow)
    Here’s where the kitty sits (smooth other eyebrow)
    Eye Winker
    Tom Tinker
    Nose Smeller
    Mouth Eater
    Chip Chopper
    Gully gully gully! (under the chin)

  92. Kristin Says:

    My mother (from her Irish mother, I guess) used to say this:

    This is where the coachman sits (lightly tapping the hairline at top of forehead)
    This is here he cracks his whip (lighly running her finger across the forehead)
    Eyeblinker (lightly touching right eyelid under brow)
    Eyewinker (lightly touching left eyelid under brow)
    Nosedropper (tapping tip of nose)
    Moutheater (tapping lips)
    Chinchopper, chinchopper, chinchopper (jiggling her hand under chin and tickling)

  93. Sunny Says:

    I learned this song in Girl Scouts as well. The lyrics I learned were slightly different:

    Hansel, my son. Vas is das here?
    Das is mine …… my mama, dear

    ….., ….., rinky dinky doo
    That’s what I learned in my school, ya ya!

  94. Nicole Says:

    Wow, I am SO glad I googled this song! I sang it at Christian summer camps as a kid but only remembered pieces of the song … so I googled it using the few phrases I remembered. I really wanted to pass this onto my kids because I loved it so much. Now I finally can! I think mine went like this:

    Mine hand on mineself, vas is das here? Das is my head knocker, my mama dear. Head knocker, head knocker, nicky nicky noo, woo woo! Dat’s vat I learned in da school, yah yah!

    The rest were:
    sweat boxer
    eye winker
    nose blower
    mouth eater
    chin chopper
    chest ? (I know we said it but can’t remember)
    bread basket
    waist bender
    lap sitter
    knee bender
    foot stomper

    Yay!

  95. cherish Says:

    Mine goes;
    Forehead painer
    Eye winker
    Tom tinker
    Nose dauber
    Mouth eater
    Chin chomper
    and a Gobble gobble gobbble gobble

  96. nancy Says:

    Mine was from the Amish country in PA.
    My hands by my side, vas ist das here (point to head)
    Vas ist my “think boxer” my teacher dear.
    Think boxer, dinky dinky doo,
    that’s what we learned in our school.
    eye blinker,nose smeller,mouth eater, chin chopper, rubber necker, chest protector, bread basket, lap sitter, knee bender, ….
    that’s all I can remember. can you add?

  97. Cindy Says:

    Passed from my Ohio grandmother, through my mother, to me, my children and grandchildren:

    Here’s where the cat sits,
    Here’s where he eats his dinner,
    Eye winker
    Tom tinker
    Nose smeller
    Mouth eater
    Chin chipper
    Giddy-giddy-giddy!!

  98. Cheri from down South Says:

    I’m 60 + and remember singing this song in Michigan.
    Vat is dis, my son? Vat is dis? Vat is dis?
    (pointing to the part of the body)
    This is my hat-topper. Das vat it is. Hat-topper, doodle do.
    That’s what we learn in the school.
    There is a version above which is about the same as mine.
    I’m really glad some people remember the old songs.
    Thanks.

  99. weck9406 Says:

    The version I grew up with was off of a kids album (I can’t remember the name of it). It went something like this (but not entirely certain about some of the parts:

    With my head on my shoulders now what have we here?
    This is my brow blister my sister dear.
    Brow blister, brow blister
    Down by the pool.
    That what we learn in the school.

    Each part was repeated:

    Head on my shoulders
    Kiss maker
    Nose blower
    Eye winker
    Brow blister

    I’m not sure that was all of them either. I am hoping I can find the album somewhere so my kids can enjoy it. It had…. Ooo, while typing this I just remembered the name of the album. It was “Little Red School House”. Did anyone else have this when they were growing up?

  100. Pradeep Kashyap Says:

    My grand mother used to sing this to us to teach us English. When we were young. Some of the ones I remember go like this

    Hands on my Side,
    What is this Dear,
    this is my Head Boiler Mommy my dear
    Head Boiler, Head Boiler
    Inky Dinky Doo
    This is what I learnt, when I went to school.

    Hands on my Side,
    What is this Dear,
    this is my Nose blower Mommy my dear
    Head Boiler, Nose blower
    Inky Dinky Doo
    This is what I learnt, when I went to school

    Hands on my Side,
    What is this Dear,
    this is my Eye Blinker Mommy my dear
    Head Boiler, Nose blower, Eye Blinker
    Inky Dinky Doo
    This is what I learnt, when I went to school

    ……………………….

    Would love if some one else has the same set of words. I beleive that this could be something that My Granny got during her growing up days in the British Raj in India.

  101. Robert Sandridge Says:

    I remember my mother doing this to my brother and I when we were little and I have done the same to my three children. I look forward to doing it with my grandchildren one day. Forehead thumper, eye winker, tom tinker, nose dropper, mouth eater, chin chopper, and a long white gitchy-gitchy-goo. Forehead, right eye, left eye, nose, mouth, chin, and tickle from chin to belly.

  102. Mary B Says:

    My kids grandpa always said
    Fort Knocker
    Eye Winker
    Tum Tinker
    Nose Smeller
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Chopper
    Get your golly hopper! and tickle there neck

  103. Gram Says:

    As it had been sung in a rhyme and played as you touch each area of the face. Passed on for close to 100 years in our family.

    Head-achy
    eye-winky
    eye-peeper
    nose-dropper
    mouth-eater
    chin-chopper
    gully, gully, gully

  104. Katt Says:

    Head of Hair
    Forehead Bare
    Eye blinker
    Nose smeller
    Mouth eater
    Tummy tinker
    Chin-Chopper, Chin-Chopper, Chin-Chopper!

    My mom used to do it to me. And I did to my son.

  105. james Says:

    Top Notcher
    Sweat Brower
    Eye Blinker
    Stink Smeller
    Loud Speaker
    Chin Chomper
    Rubber Necker
    Chest protector
    Bread Basket

    Plus a few inappropriate ones for those family reunions with too many drinks. We did it as kids to our parents amusement and we do it to this day but some have continued below the waste…

  106. Lisa Yannucci Says:

    My name is Spencer and I am from Utah and my great grandmother from germany used to sing it like this (she was a little weird but we love this version)

    Wis, my, hand on mine shoulder
    and dos es dos here
    dos is de dominiker my darling my dear
    dominiker and Das vat ve learned in de school yard

    you would always repeat with my hand on my shoulder and then go down the body pointing and what ever you were singing about you would point to, then it would gradually go faster and faster.

    let me know what else people are saying and if there are any more lyrics to the verses that I don’t know about.
    thanks

    Spencer

  107. Nick Says:

    Sweaty Boxer
    Eye Sighter
    Nose Wiper
    Bull Sh*ter
    Chin Wiper
    Rubber Necker
    Chest Protector
    Bread Basket
    Knee Bender
    Beetle Crusher
    Nikki Nikki Nikki Noo
    That’s what they taught me when I went to school

  108. Elwood Says:

    My Mom had six children and our version was similar – it went:
    Eye winker, tom tinker, nose smeller, mouth eater, chin chopper… gully, gully, gully (while tickling under the chin).

  109. Misty Says:

    Wow! what a lot of different variations! The one that came down through our family is:

    Ford-bender (touch forehead)
    Eye-winker (touch left eye)
    Tom-tinker (touch right eye)
    Nose-smeller (touch nose)
    Mouth-eater (touch mouth)
    Chin-chopper (touch chin)
    Doodle-op, doodle-op, doodle-op! (tickle under the chin)

  110. Myra Says:

    My grandmother used to tell us this version while touching forehead, eyes, cheeks, nose and mouth–then chin:
    “Here sits the Lord Mayor and here’s his two men
    Here sits the rooster and here sits the hen
    And two little chickies and the hole they walk in.
    AND
    Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper chin!!

  111. Thea Says:

    This is so great! My mom’s version was
    Fore bumper
    eye blinker
    tom tinker
    nose smeller
    mouth eater
    chin chopper
    gully,gully,gully

  112. susan Says:

    The version I grew up with is this (and after reading all the others I believe I am not remembering the nose part correctly and forgot the mouth part??). Nevertheless, my grandchildren love it! This came from German heritage. Love your website.

    Here’s where the cat sits (tap top of forehead twice)
    Here’s where she falls (tap bridge of nose twice)
    Eye winker – Tom tinker (tap each of the following once)
    Nose knocker
    Chin chopper
    Giddy, giddy, giddy (tickle under chin)

  113. Jane Says:

    So glad to see this post! I’ve been looking for the words to a song my fifth-grade teacher, Esther Freeman, sang to us back in 1945. All I remembered was this: “I put my hands on myself. What dis are here? Dis are my head- tinker, mother so dear! Head-tinker, head-tinker, dinker dinker doo. Dat’s what I learned in my school.” Next is . . . “Eye blinker, head-tinker, dinker dinker doo . . . .[etc.]” I also remembered “nose blower.” Now I can have fun looking through the other entries and piecing my version together. Thanks!

  114. cathi hartline Says:

    I remember it as:
    Forebender (touch the forehead)
    Eyewinker (touch the eyes)
    Nose Dripper (touch the nose)
    Mouth Eater (touch the mouth)
    Chin Dropper (touch the chin)
    Then gettsi gettis go as you tickle all the way down to the toes~.~
    I got in trouble a lot because I always refered to my head as a forebender.~.~

  115. Mike Emmer Says:

    Just sang this to distract my grandson as we changed his diaper. But the version I was taught (and by who I’ve long forgotten) was the German-accented one as follows:

    Vas is das, mein kind, vas is das, vas is das?
    (Point to my head) Das is my hat-wrecker (or so I always thought though now I see it was probably “hat racker.”)
    Hat-wrecker, hat-wrecker, doodly-doo (with a twirly gesture at my head)
    That’s what we learn in the camp.

    Followed by:
    (Brow) Sveat-maker
    (Nose) Shtink-smeller
    (Lips) Girl-kisser (or boy-kisser)
    (Throat) Soup strainer
    (Belly) Bread basket
    (Butt) None-of-your-business!

    Nice to get some of the other body parts to fill in, especially if the diaper job is a little more challenging (pronounced “poopy.”)

  116. Mark Says:

    I learned this as a kid in the late 1940s. I think it was on a children’s 45rpm record. The yellow ones.
    eye peepers
    nose dripper
    sweat boxer
    icky dicky dicky do
    That’s what we learn in the school.

  117. Harry Says:

    I did a google search and came up with this…. sooooo cool! But you are all wrong… just kidding. Apparently families have different versions and many people don’t know any of them. My wife thought I was crazy when I did it this to our first born 25 years ago. She wanted me to change it to something like “Mozart was born it 1756…” she couldn’t rhyme anything further.

    My family did it this way:

    Fore-eye bender
    Eye winker
    Tom tinker
    Nose smeller
    Mouth eater
    Chin chopper
    and…. Gilly, gilly, gilly.

    My 15 month old grand son loves it… when anyone says “fore-eye bender” he quickly points to his forehead and laughs.

    Now with my 15 month grandson it’s really fun whe

  118. Heather Says:

    The way I remembered it from childhood (could have been in Massachusetts, New Hampshire or Ohio) was most similar to nancy’s version – Nov 23, 2010
    “Mein hands by mein sides, vat ist dis hier?
    Das ist mein think-boxer, My Teacher Dear …

    Dat’s vat ve learned in der Shul.”

    This is so fun to see again.

  119. James S. Wood Says:

    Check out this one on YouTube:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUpMqUIlPfg

  120. Lani Says:

    Door Knocker
    Eye Winker
    Tom Tinker
    Nose Dropper
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Chopper
    Gully Gully Gully

  121. halie Says:

    My mom taught us:
    Head banner
    Eye winker
    Tommy tinker
    Nose dropper
    Mouth eater
    Chin chopper
    Gully gully gully (tickle the neck)

    My kids love it. My husband, sister’s husband, and sister’s boyfriend think it’s made up haha. And we don’t sing it.

  122. J Anne Says:

    Here’s the version that I learned in school (a very long time ago) in the Buffalo, NY area

    Vas is dis my son
    Vas is dis
    Vas is dis?
    (pointing to the body part)
    Dis is my bread basket
    Das vas is dis
    – chorus -
    bread basket
    ooo la looo
    das vas ve learn in da schule
    (this continued for various body parts and ended with a run thru of the entire list and a repeat of the chorus)

    Good memories
    thanks for the website collection!!

  123. jennifer Says:

    My Scottish grandmother sang it to us as

    the coachman sits here and he cracks his whip
    Eye blinker
    Tom blinker
    nose dropper
    mouth eater
    chin chopper
    and gettichy gettichy goo

  124. Miranda Says:

    This was said to me as a child, and I have said it to all my baby nieces and nephews (by the way I am from WV)

    Head bumper
    Eye Winker
    Nose Dropper
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Chopper
    Gully gully gully…

  125. Mary Claire Says:

    Actually, there are 2 different versions. (And I taught a summer camp when I was younger) The first one is Here’s where the kitty sits (while touching the forehead), here’s where he jumps to (touching the nose), eye winker, tom tinker, (touching the eyes) nose blower, mouth eater, chin chopper, giddy, giddy, goo (while tickling the child under his chin).

    The other in actually a song.
    My hand on my head and what is this here
    This in my head knocker mama my dear
    head knocker, head knocker
    ringy, dingy, dingy, doo
    That’s what I learned at my school
    Some school!

    Then the song continues with:
    eye winker
    tom tinker
    nose blower
    mouth eater
    chin chopper
    neck stretcher
    bread basket
    down sitter
    knee bender
    foot tapper

    We used to have a great time singing that one at camp.

  126. Kalen Says:

    The one my grandma use to always do to me was:
    Head bumper
    Eye winker
    Tin tinker
    Nose dropper
    Mouth eater
    Chin chopper
    & a gully gully gully.

    :]

  127. Lisa Says:

    The oldest version in English I’ve found of this rhyme so far is:

    Eye winker,
    Tom Tinker,
    Nose dropper,
    Mouth eater,
    Chin chopper,
    Chin chopper.

    It can be found in print back in 1846.

    You can go here for more info on Eye Winker.

  128. Sharon Says:

    I learned it this way:

    Head-achy
    Eye-winky
    Nose-merry
    Mouth-eater
    Chin-chopper
    Gully, gully, gully….

  129. Jennifer Says:

    This is the version my great aunt taught me. I used to know it in German but have forgotten it:

    Laus Bumper
    Forehead
    Eye Winker
    Tom Tinker
    Nose Blower
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Chopper
    Golly Hopper

  130. ANN Says:

    My mom would say:
    Eye winker-touching left eye
    Tom tinker-touching right eye
    Nose smeller-touch nose
    mouth eater-touch mouth
    Chin chapper-touching chin
    And a goochy-goochy goo-tickling chin.
    I am 52 years old and my mom is 82 years old.

  131. MimiLou Says:

    I learned it from my father, whose ancestry was Dutch Irish from upstate New York. His version was pretty much the same as what Abi has posted. I am pushing 50 years now and I still remembered most of it. Thanks for filling in the blanks for me!

    –Dat’s vat ve lernt in de Schulehaus–

  132. LeighAnn Says:

    Fore-bumper
    Eye-winker
    Nose-smeller
    Tom-tinker
    Mouth-eater
    Chin-chopper
    GOBBLE GOOBLE GOBBLE

  133. Sally Says:

    I woke up this morning with this nursery rhyme in my head (which is weird because I don’t have kids and haven’t thought of it for years!), and wondered if it was something from my mom’s family or if others knew it. It was gratifying to find this site immediately after searching “cat sits eye winker.” I had no idea the variety of versions or the origin!

    My mother’s version:

    This is where the cat sits (forehead)
    Eye Winker (one eyelid)
    Tommy Tinker (other eyelid)
    Nosey smeller
    Mouthy eater
    Chinny chopper
    Gully, gully, gully, gully, gully … (tickling from under chin to chest)

  134. Bill Lane Says:

    The version I learned was sung with a fake German accent – 1950’s
    I lay hands on myself, vas dis das dere?
    Dis is my head knocker my momma dear,
    Head knocker, eye winker, nose blower, chin chopper,
    nicka, nicka, nicka noo
    das what we learn in de school

    The song continues by adding in new body parts

  135. Sarita Says:

    I know this is a really old thread but was trying to look up the words and came across it…. I’m really interested to see that it looks like our grandpa’s version was the other way round!!

    If I remember it correctly, it goes:

    Chin cherry
    Lips merry
    Nose nippy
    Eyes winky
    Brow brinky
    And all over the hill and down! (tickling over the firead to the back of the neck!!)

  136. cindy Says:

    forward bumper, eye winker, tom tinker, nose smeller, mouth eater, chin chopper, gully, gully, gully

  137. aj Says:

    Here is a YouTube link to the German version: Vas Iss Das Here? by Stan Wolowic & The Polka Chips
    http://youtu.be/bV4ajvxjLyo

  138. Mark Says:

    My dad is a hillbilly from the Appalachian rim. Here is what he used to torment us kids with.

    Far’d Pardah (Forhead Parter)
    Eye Winkah
    Tom Tinkah
    Nose droppah
    Mouth eatah
    Chin choppah
    Giddy giddy giddy (tickles the neck)

  139. Jen M. Says:

    I was just doing this before changing my 3 month old daughter and wanted to know if there were other verses/how it originated. My mom used it with us as kids and it would sometimes put us to sleep (she would do it several times over and over and do it more quietly and eventually skip the tickling part at the end).

    Here’s how I learned it (I’m also from WV):

    Head-knocker (touch forehead)
    Eye-blinker (touch one eyelid or next to eye)
    Tom-tinker (touch other eyelid or next to other eye)
    Nose-dropper (touch nose)
    Mouth-eater (touch mouth or right below mouth)
    Chin-chopper (touch chin)
    Giddy-Giddy-Giddy (Get her, get her, get her) (Get him, get him, get him)
    (Tickle under chin)

  140. Jaynie Says:

    I have tried to remember this little ditty since I was a child…in the 50’s…my grandmother used to do it to little ones that came to visit…Thanks so much for all the different versions…I was able to piece together the one she uised.

    Door Knocker
    Eye Winker
    Tom Tinker
    Nose Dropper
    Mouth Eater
    Chin Chopper
    Gully Gully Gully

  141. Alex Says:

    My Grandmother was from North Georgia and she would say:

    Far Arce (to head)
    Eye Seer (to eyes)
    Nose Smeller (to nose)
    Mouth Eater (to mouth)
    Chin Chopper (to chin)
    Gully Hopper (tickle under chin)

  142. Brenda Says:

    As the oldest (53) in my department at work, I was asking who knew the words to certain nursery rhymes and was shocked that not one person out of 6 had even heard of this rhyme. I was beginning to think my family was the only one. We are from Missouri and my mother remembers her mom telling her this rhyme back in the late 30’s, and of course our’s is yet a different version:
    Hair puller (touching hair)
    Fore head knocker (knocking on fore head)
    Eye winker, eye peeper, nose smeller, mouth eater, chin chopper and gully whopper. Of course this is always best if there is more than one child, not knowing who is gonna get their gully whopper tickled is always fun for all!!

  143. tone Says:

    In the UK /India version we sang as kids the chorus was always “ding,ding ding -do…”
    but we had other ones I can’t remember like:

    Rear-bumper,rear-bumper
    ding ding ding do
    That’s what we learned in the school,mommy.

    We also sang the ” kukaburra sits in the old gum tree ” song…

  144. Dan Says:

    Wow I am blown away that this exists elsewhere. We were taught a variant of this by an old German lady (Mrs. Mueller, our scoutmaster’s mother) in our boy scout troop circa 1970. I don’t remember the order of parts, but this was the chorus, which was running through my head today.

    And der nicky, nicky noo
    Das what we learned in der schule

    Thanks to everyone for sharing.

  145. Richard Schultz Says:

    My dad sang me a similar German song as a child

    What is this my Son what is this what is this
    This is my
    Hatracker
    Fore bumper
    Eye seer
    Nose

  146. Richard Schultz Says:

    Sorry…it went before I finished
    Nosesmeller
    Cookie duster
    Cookie eater
    Guly guly
    That’s what we learned in the school house

  147. Raji Says:

    hi
    i am very happy to see the comments here on this rhyme. this rhyme i heard for the first time from my son who is 6 yrs old. he learned it from his school. actually he forgot the words . just to search the i typed in google. which gave me very good results.

  148. Evil Twin Steven Says:

    I remember my dad and my uncles, when they had a few too many at family gatherings, sing a slightly naughty, but harmless, version. Everyone would laigh because they still remembered it in sync from when they were kids.

    “Brain basket
    Eye Peepers
    Snot Locker
    Girl Kisser
    Chinny Chomp-Chomp
    T*tty Flop Flop
    Stomach Boom Boom”
    (And as a finale’, while pointing at you-know-what area)
    “Dis is my Troublemaker, yah, mammma dear!”

  149. Monica Says:

    Hi all,
    I grew up with this song also, my dad (now 65) learned it in a summer camp in the DC area. It has German words, but I don’t know what they are, or what they mean, so I’ll spell them as we’ve always pronounced them. I’d love to know the real words and their meaning! The words start from top of the head (domineeker) and then include forehead (brow-sneaker), eye blinker (eye), snot blower (nose), kiss maker (mouth), heart breaker (heart), belly acher (stomach), knee bender (knee), toe stubber (toe).

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the dominicer my darlin, my dear
    Domineerker, and thats what I learned in the school, yah! yah!

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the brow-sneaker my darlin, my dear
    Domineeker, brow-sneaker, and thats what I learned in the school, yah! yah!

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the eye blinker my darlin, my dear
    Eye blinker, domineeker, brow-sneaker, and thats what I learned in the school, yah! yah!

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the snot blower my darlin, my dear
    Snot blower, eye blinker, domineeker, brow-sneaker, and thats what I learned in the school, yah! yah!

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the kiss maker my darlin, my dear
    Kiss maker, Snot blower, eye blinker, domineeker, brow-sneaker, and thats what I learned in the school, yah! yah!

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the heart breaker my darlin, my dear
    Heart breaker, Kiss maker, Snot blower, eye blinker, domineeker, brow-sneaker, and thats what I learned in the school, yah! yah!

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the belly acher my darlin, my dear
    Belly acher, Heart breaker, Kiss maker, Snot blower, eye blinker, domineeker, brow-sneaker, and thats what I learned in the school, yah! yah!

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the knee bender my darlin, my dear
    Knee Bender, Belly acher, Heart breaker, Kiss maker, Snot blower, eye blinker, domineeker, brow-sneaker, and thats what I learned in the school, yah! yah!

    With my hand on my shoulder and vas-ish-star-sheer,
    This is the toe stubber my darlin, my dear
    Toe stubber, Knee Bender, Belly acher, Heart breaker, Kiss maker, Snot blower, eye blinker, domineeker, brow-sneaker, annnnnnd thaaaaaaaats what I learned in the schooooooool, yah! yah!

  150. peij Says:

    with my head on my shoulders now what have we here? that is my
    Think maker my sister dear, (head)
    Think maker think maker down by the pool. thats what we learned at the school.
    Eye blinker
    Sneeze blower
    Ear listener
    Kiss maker
    Air blower (chest)
    Bread basket (stomach)
    Lap sitter
    Knee bender
    Foot stomper
    Down by the pool thats what we learn in the school ya ya

  151. Becca Says:

    I grew up watching my mom do this to us children and then passed it onto my children and grandchildren.

    Eye Winker (touch the left eye)
    Tom Tinker (touch the right eye)
    Nose Dripper (touch the nose)
    Cookie Duster (touch above upper lip)
    Mouth Eater (touch the mouth)
    Chin Chuckler (touch the chin)
    TICKLE TICKLE TICKLE-while tickling them under the chin.

  152. Sara Says:

    My mom sang a German variety I guess

    Vas ist my head
    Vas ist vas here
    Vas ist mein head thinker mommy my dear
    Head thinker head thinker
    Inky dinky doo
    That’s what I learned at my school
    Ma ma

    Vas ist my eye
    Vas ist vas here
    Vas ist my eye winker mommy my dear
    Eye winker head thinker
    Inky dinky doo
    That’s what I learned at my school
    Ma ma

    Only time I saw my mom truly laugh was while singing this song…

    Foot stinker
    Knee bender
    Bread basket
    Gully gullet (neck)
    Chin chopper
    Food chewer
    Nose blower
    Eye winker
    Head thinker

    Inky dinky do

    Then she said them all in reverse…
    Which she usually messed up and laughed!! My favorite part!

  153. Grammy Smif Says:

    While playing with Grandchildren or other small friends, would take her fingers moving slowly and saying:
    “Eye winker” – laying one finger on an eye
    “Nose smeller” – laying finger on or lightly pinching the nose
    “Mouth eater” – laying fingers on lips
    “Chin chopper” – laying fingers on chin
    Then quickly moving fingers under chin to neck and tickle, saying, “Get her (or “him”) in the gully hopper”.

  154. RAL Says:

    Nicky Nacky Noo song Rugby version:

    Sweaty box
    Browbeater
    Eye blinker
    Nose wiper
    Bull shiter
    Chin wiper
    Rubber necker
    Chest protector
    Bread basket
    Dicky wiper
    Thigh thumper
    Knee knocker
    Shin shanker
    Arse kicker

  155. kevin richart Says:

    I taught surgical technologists for a few years, I would ask my students when their first anatomy education was. They all said college. Then I introduced them to this song. They all knew one like it from childhood.
    The point is that learning can be fun.

  156. Erica Says:

    Ours was:
    forebender (touch forehead)
    Eyewinker (eye)
    Tomtinker ( other eye)
    Nosedropper (nose)
    Moutheater (mouth)
    Chin chopper (chin)
    Gillywasher! (Tickle neck)

  157. Judy Says:

    Louse bed
    Forehead
    Eye winker
    Tommy tinker
    Nose dropper
    Mouth eater
    Chin chopper
    giddy, giddy, giddy
    (Per my Great Grandfather Pawpaw who was born in late 19th century

  158. ashley Says:

    My Italian grandfather is now passed away and nobody in my family can remember this similar saying in Italian starting with occhi bella and goes through other facial features then he would tap our nose at the end and say ding ding ding

  159. Dianne Gray Says:

    The version I remember when I was a child is:

    Hands on myself
    What is this here?
    This is my headknocker mama my dear
    Headknocker, headknocker, nik nik nik new
    That’s what I learned in the school
    Hands on myself
    What is this here?
    This is my eyeblinker mama my dear
    Eyeblinker, headknocker, nik nik nik new
    That’s what I learned in the school
    Hands on myself
    What is this here?
    This is my noseblower mama my dear
    Noseblower, eyeblinker, headknocker nik nik nik new
    That’s what I learned in the school
    Hands on myself
    What is this here?
    This is my chinchopper mama my dear
    Chinchopper, noseblower, eyeblinker, headknocker nik nik nik new
    That’s what I learned in the school
    Hands on myself
    What is this here?
    This is my rubbernecker mama my dear
    Rubbernecker, chinchopper, noseblower, eyeblinker, headknocker
    nik nik nik new
    That’s what I learned in the school
    Hands on myself what is this here?
    This is my breadbasket (stomach) mama my dear
    Breadbasket, rubbernecker, chinchopper, noseblower, eyeblinker, headknocker
    Nik nik nik new
    That’s what I learned in the school.

    Have a nice day!

  160. Martin Says:

    my Irish mother’s version:

    (touching parts as you go)

    Head of hair,
    Forehead bare,
    Eyes winking,
    Nose dripping
    and a chinchopper, chichoppe,r chin (tickles under chin)

    I only remembered it when she sang it to my children.

  161. deey bryant Says:

    I learned this rhyme from my grandfather (Cherokee) in Tennessee it went: Tommy Tinker – touch forehead
    Eyeblinker- touch eyes
    nose dripper- touch nose
    mouth eater- touch lips
    chin chopper- touch chin
    giddy giddy giddy whopper – tickle neck
    now i play this with my children

  162. Candye Says:

    What is this, mommy dear? (point to head)
    This is my brain thinker, do you hear?
    Brain thinker, nickie nickie do (point)
    That’s what I learned from school today.

    What is this, mommy dear? (point to eye)
    This is my eye winker, do you hear?
    Eye winker, Brain thinker, nickie nickie do (point to each)
    That’s what I learned from school today.

    What is this, mommy dear? (point to nose)
    This is my nose blower, do you hear?
    Nose blower, eye winker, brain thinker, nickie nickie do (point to each)
    That’s what I learned from school today.

    What is this, mommy dear? (point to mouth)
    This is my food chomper, do you hear?
    Food chomper, nose blower, eye winker, brain thinker, nickie nickie do (point to each)
    That’s what I learned from school today.

    (Continue on with:
    Bread basket
    Knee knocker
    Shin kicker… work backwards and point each time)

    This is one of the first songs I remember learning from my mother when I was small. :-)

  163. Jennifer Says:

    Head bumper, eye winker, tom tinker, nose dropper, mouth eater, chin chopper, and at that point you start ticking the child going “gitzy gitzy gitzy.”

  164. Theresa Says:

    Can’t remember the exact version my grandfather sang to us but it had the word noggin in it. We would all laugh just trying to keep up with pointing to each body parts although we couldnt remember the words since he sang it so fast. Very fond memories hearing this song sung by him as a kid

  165. Jen Says:

    http://youtu.be/1XlwCt6jBc8

    This is the one I learned.

    From the Snoopy and the red Baron record.
    “This is what we learn in the school” is the song title

  166. Melody Says:

    I grew up on a farm in central Ohio & seem to have yet another differing version I fondly remember my mom saying to me. I was born in 1953.
    Here’s where the rooster sits (forehead)
    Here’s where he crows… (bridge of nose)
    Eye winker, time tinker
    Nose smeller, mouth eater
    Chin chopper
    Gully-gully-gully! (tickling the neck)

  167. Johanna Says:

    Fascinating! I was singing parts of it to my niece and couldn’t remember all of the parts, so tried to find it. My husband never heard of it and thought I had made it up. Our version did not have a German accent and we called it “Inka Dinka Doo”. Apparently there is a completely different song with that name – don’t know if the words were changed to accord with a romantic song of the 30’s.

    I think the rhyme and the song must have different origins. Thank you for all of your comments. It seems to be a world-wide song!

  168. Mary Kay Says:

    The version I grew up with finally came to me.
    What is this here?
    I think I know.
    This is my headacher ya papa dear.
    headacher headacher ya Papa dear.
    That’s what I learned in my school,
    Yaya. (Clap twice when you say yaya)
    (Repeat first verse. Keep adding a body part until you reach your toes)
    Eye blinker
    nose blower
    Trouble maker
    chest protector
    breadbasket
    knee Bender
    toe kicker

  169. Mary Kay Says:

    Oops I forgot rubber necker.

  170. Margaret Says:

    My South Australian mother taught us:

    Ring the bell (gently pull forelock of hair)
    Knock on the door (knock on forehead)
    Peep in! (gently lift both eye lids or pretend to)
    Lift the latch (finger lifts the tip of the nose upwards)
    Wipe your boots (finger wipes on the skin between nose and upper lip)
    Walk in! (finger tries to walk in between the child’s lips)
    Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin, chin chin (fingers tickle under the chin)

    As an adult I believe it was meant to be a way of coaxing a child to eat, but my mother used it as a simple fun game. My grandchildren still LOVE it! “More?” “More?”

  171. Ron Says:

    Hands on mineself
    Vas is das here?
    Das is mine head knocker,
    My mama dear.
    Head knocker, head knocker,
    Nicky nicky nicky noo
    Das vat ve learned in da American school

    From around 1960 in grade school. Slight difference, but the “American school” made it an immigrant song. I remember that it was called “The Immigrant Song”.

  172. patricia Says:

    this is my version when i grew up in the 70s

    with my hand on my heart what have i here
    this is my brain boxer please teacher dear
    brain boxer nickey nacky do
    that is what i was taught when i went to school
    (and then you go on with)
    eye blinker (eye)
    nose dropper (nose)
    chatter boxer (mouth)
    chin wagger (chin)
    rubber necker (neck)
    chest protector (chest)
    bread basket (stomach)
    sit me downer (bum)
    knee bender (knee)
    foot slogger (foot)
    (and two which i made up myself ‘ear listener’ ‘hand waver’

Leave a Reply

Subscribe without commenting

Advertisement
Mama Lisa Facebook Badge
Mama Lisa Twitter Badge
Mama Lisa Pinterest Badge

Help Support Mama Lisa's World
with just
$1.99

Find us on Google+

Help Support Mama Lisa's World
with just
$1.99