"'Hårgalåten' (The Hårga Song) is a traditional folk melody based on a legend (the oldest record of the legend is from 1785 by a man named Johan Gabriel Lindström). The legend takes place on Hårgaberget which translates to 'The Hårga Mountain'." -Johannes Andersson

The legend is of the Hårgadansen (Hårga Dance). It's about the devil disguised as a fiddler and the youngsters in the village of Hårga he made dance themselves to death.

You can read about the legend in the Song Notes below.

Notes

"Here is some background. This is a translation about the legend from the Wikipedia page in Swedish... -Johannes Andersson

"It is a late Saturday night and all the young people in Hårga have gathered to dance in a barn. Suddenly in the middle of the dance, the music gets interrupted and a new fiddler steps forward from the shadows. He had a large dark hat on his head and you could see a pair of 'burning' eyes. The fiddler lifted the violin to his chin and began to play a song that had never been heard before. All the young people immediately began to dance to the new tune. But once they entered the dance, they could not stop dancing. The dance continued throughout the night and when dawn arrived the fiddler left the barn. After him came all the dancers, following him in a line. They couldn't stop dancing. The sound of the violin fueled the dancers will to move their feet. When the church bells rang for service, the dancers disappeared with the fiddler. A girl remained laying on the dance floor in the lodge. No one had listened to her when she warned them about the fiddler, and no one noticed the fiddlers hooves in the midst of the wildest dance they've ever been through.

The legend continues, saying that the fiddler led the dancers to Hårgaberget (Hårga Mountain) where they danced until only their bones were left. Some even say that you can still see the marks from the ring dance at Hårgaberget, and if you are so brave to venture out on a night of the full moon, it is said that you can hear the music that the devil once played for those who died."

Watch
The song starts in the video below at 0:40.
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Thanks and Acknowledgements

Many thanks to Johannes Andersson for sharing this song with us and for translating the Wikipedia entry about the legend for us! Translation by Johannes Andersson and Lisa Yannucci.

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