In some instances in the past, the "Fire on the Mountain" song was mixed with the "Jim Along Josie" song.

"Jim along" is believed to mean "get along".

Notes

"One proof that 'jim along' was thought of as an imperative verb is that 'get along' sometimes took its place." -Play-Party Songs from Eastern Illinois (The Journal of American Folklore, 1919).

Alternate Chorus:

Hey, Jim along, hey, Jim along!
Hey, Jim along a Josie!

Here's a version of the song from "Some Play-Party Games in Michigan" (1920):

1. Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Josy!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Jo!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Josy!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Jo!

2. If you think you've got a beau,
Step right up and do si do!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Josy!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Jo!

3. If you think you've got a beau,
Fly to the arms of do si do!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Josy!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Jo!

4. Fire's in the mountains, run, boys, run!
Kitty's in the cream-crock, run, girls, run!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Josy!
Hey, Jim along, Jim along, Jo!

Thanks and Acknowledgements

Versions of this song can be found in the following:

-The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 27 (1914) -The song was sent in from Missouri.
-Some Play-Party Songs from Eastern Illinois, The Journal of American Folklore Vol. 32, (1919).
-Some Play-Party Games in Michigan, The Journal of American Folklore Vol. 33 (1920).

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