This rhyme can be found in A History of Nursery Rhymes (1899) by Percy B. Green. Green wrote, "Two of the courtesans of Charles II's time were Lucy Locket and Kitty Fisher. The following rhyme suggests that Kitty Fisher supplanted Lucy Locket in Charles' fickle esteem".

"Lucy Locket Lost Her Pocket" is sung to the tune of "Yankee Doodle Went to Town"...

Lucy Locket Lost Her Pocket - English Children's Songs - England - Mama Lisa's World: Children's Songs and Rhymes from Around the World  - Intro Image

Notes

Charles II ruled from 1660 until 1685, during a time known as the Restoration (after the Puritans ruled England under Cromwell).

Here's another version of Lucy Locket:

Lucy Locket lost her pocket,
Kitty Fisher found it;
Nothing in it, nothing in it,
But the binding round it.

Lucy Locket Lost Her Pocket - English Children's Songs - England - Mama Lisa's World: Children's Songs and Rhymes from Around the World  - Comment After Song Image
Lucy Locket Lost Her Pocket - English Children's Songs - England - Mama Lisa's World: Children's Songs and Rhymes from Around the World 1
Lucy Locket Lost Her Pocket - English Children's Songs - England - Mama Lisa's World: Children's Songs and Rhymes from Around the World 2
Lucy Locket Lost Her Pocket - English Children's Songs - England - Mama Lisa's World: Children's Songs and Rhymes from Around the World 3
Listen

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1st MP3 Recording by Carol Stripling.

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2nd MP3 recording performed by 17 talented university student musicians who were sisters in the Sigma Alpha Iota International Music Fraternity for Women at California State University-Stanislaus in 2007. The musical score the recording is based on comes from Our Old Nursery Rhymes (1911) arranged by Alfred Moffat.

Sheet Music

Sheet Music - Lucy Locket Lost Her Pocket

Thanks and Acknowledgements

The first illustration comes from Kate Greenaway's Mother Goose (1881) and the second illustration is from The Baby's Bouquet, A Fresh Bunch of Rhymes and Tunes by Walter Crane (1878). The second version of the rhyme (and the 3rd illustration) is from The Real Mother Goose (1916), illustrated by Blanche Fisher Wright. The 4th illustration is from The Little Mother Goose (1912), illustrated by Jessie Willcox Smith. The 5th illustration is by H. Willebeck Le Mair from Our Old Nursery Rhymes (1911), arranged by Alfred Moffat.

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